TVA

WUOT News, Matt Moon

A study by the financial services firm Lazard suggests the federal government’s sale of the Tennessee Valley Authority could be expensive, disruptive and current TVA customers might end up paying more for electricity.

WUOT News, Matt Moon

  

  For more than 30 years, Stephen Smith has been a thorn firmly planted into the side of the Tennessee Valley Authority.  The Executive Director of the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy has never been shy about holding the giant utility accountable, especially when it comes to the TVA’s dismal record on air quality

WUOT News, Matt Shafer Powell

(NOTE:  This story was updated on 6/4/14  to include revised debt figures)

For the second time in as many years, President Barack Obama’s budget contains a suggestion that the federal government rid itself of the Tennessee Valley Authority and its $26.3 billion debt.

WUOT News, Matt Shafer Powell

It was one of the darkest moments in the Tennessee Valley Authority’s long history. 

Residents of the Swan Pond community living near the TVA’s Kingston Fossil Plant awoke early on the morning of December 22, 2008 to a sea of gray sludge barreling its way through the community.  More than a billion gallons of coal ash being stored in a nearby pond had broken through a retaining wall and blanketed more than 300 acres around the plant, destroying homes, killing fish and filling local waterways with a thick muck laden with toxic materials.  

WUOT News, Matt Shafer Powell

In 2008, a storage wall at the TVA’s Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee collapsed, dumping more than a billion gallons of coal ash waste into the surrounding rivers and community.   The wet, gray sludge covered more than 300 acres, killed thousands of fish, destroyed some nearby homes and filled the Emory and Clinch Rivers to their banks.

epw.senate.gov

  A report by the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Office of the Inspector General has cleared TVA Board Chairman William Sansom of several allegations that his financial interests violate conflict-of-interest laws and policies.  The report also found a nepotism charge levied against Sansom was simply a case of mistaken identity.

wikicommons

Tennessee Valley Authority officials are planning a public open house to display some of the archaeological discoveries unearthed during an excavation of a downtown Knoxville site.  Sealed for years beneath a parking lot, the site west of Market Square contains the foundations of three turn-of-the-century homes, one of which once belonged to businessman and politician Peter Kern.