Oak Ridge

U.S. Department of Energy

The atomic bombs that detonated over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 brought a horrific, devastating war to a close.

But it also represented the instant and complete annihilation of two cities,  the brutal death of approximately 185,000 Japanese civilians* and the dawn of the nuclear weapons age.

In the 69 years since the first bomb fell over Hiroshima, pro- and anti-nuclear forces have used these two points to engage each other in a heated debate over the ethical necessity of nuclear weapons and their proliferation. 

Oak Ridge Museum Faces Uncertain Future

Jul 21, 2014
M. Michelle Powell

  The city of Oak Ridge and the foundation that supports the American Museum of Science and Energy (AMSE) are asking the public for ideas on how to best preserve one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions. 

City officials and the AMSE Foundation are planning a community forum on Thursday, July 24 to discuss the museum’s future.

Oak Ridge To Take Another Stab At Red Light Camera Contract

Mar 24, 2014
WUOT News, Matt Shafer Powell

  UPDATE:  Oak Ridge city council rejected the resolution to extend the contract and the cameras will be removed when the contract expires on April 21.

Oak Ridge city council members will decide whether to extend the city’s red light camera contract tonight after failing to resolve the issue at an earlier meeting.

Animal Shelter To Reopen Thursday After Death Of 30 Dogs

Mar 11, 2014
facebook.com

The Oak Ridge Animal Shelter will reopen Thursday after a “difficult” week that included the death of 30 dogs, all euthanized to fight a deadly, highly-contagious virus.

“It was very tough (on the shelter employees),” said Police Lt. Robin Smith.  “They bonded with those animals.” 

East TN Heating Bills Expected To Spike With Cold Temps

Jan 29, 2014
dutil.com

 With January heating bills showing up in mailboxes soon, East Tennesseans may want to prepare themselves for an unpleasant surprise.

In Oak Ridge, City Electric Director Jack Suggs says bills for those residents who use electric sources like heat pumps could jump 30 to 40 percent from their December bills.  And December bills were substantially higher than November’s. “People do need to be bracing themselves a little bit for sticker shock,” Suggs tells WUOT News, “and they need to be thinking about putting a little extra aside.”  

Pages