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Are you looking for a locally-produced interview or feature story you heard on WUOT?  Try searching our archive.  At this point, it only goes back to 2012, but we're adding archival content every day.  If you can't find the piece you're looking for, try back in a week or email Director of News Content Matt Shafer Powell at mattshaferpowell@tennessee.edu

History is full of ironies. The U.S. Treasury launched a big one in 1928, when it selected Andrew Jackson to be the face of the twenty-dollar bill. How's that ironic? Andrew Jackson considered only precious metals such as gold and silver to have monetary value. He distrusted paper money and spent much of his presidency working to defeat a national banking system. Not exactly the poster boy for a bill that makes up 25 percent of the paper money printed in the United States this year.

WBMA Birmingham/ABC 33-40

If you grew up in the South, you grew up with tornadoes and tornado warnings. But you probably didn’t know there are some big differences between the tornadoes that happen here, and their Midwestern cousins. They’re typically deadlier. They’re harder to see. And they’re more likely to happen at night, an especially dangerous time.

Benjamin Benschneider

In her time, the ocean liner Lusitania was the finest ship to ply the Atlantic passenger route between New York and England. Her opulence and speed were well-known, and passage on the ship was considered near the height of luxury.

In eight years, Lusitania made 201 trips across the pond, sometimes setting new speed records for the transatlantic crossing. But her final voyage – number 202 – ended in tragedy, confusion and mysteries that linger to this day.

Jonathan Walton/Harvard University

About 40 years ago, Christian preachers in the U.S. started singing a seldom-heard hymn: God rewards the wealthy. It’s called the prosperity gospel, and though its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth century, it was the rise of televangelism in the 1970s and '80s that lofted prosperity theology to a wide audience.

via Flickr/Creative Commons

Tennessee voters will head to the polls on primary day, Tuesday, March 1. Gone are the paper ballots of decades past – the process is virtually all electronic now. So what happens once you press the button that records your ballot? Where does the information go? To find out, Matt Shafer Powell spoke with Chris Davis of the Knox County Election Commission.

Three years ago, an edition of Dialogue focused on the Affordable Care Act and its effects in Tennessee. Much of what the panel discussed that day in 2013 was speculative, because many of the ACA’s provisions hadn’t taken effect.

Now, consumers, doctors, hospitals and insurers are dealing with the effects – both good and bad – of the controversial law known as “Obamacare.” In this edition of Dialogue, we re-visit the ACA, health insurance and more.

Library of Congress

Nearly a century ago, when medical science was in its relative Bronze Age, a severe strain of influenza spread around the world. The flu of 1918 killed between 50 and 100 million people. Today, many people think of the flu as a routine illness. But the flu strains of today are the genetic descendants of the 1918 flu. Dr.

OKRoads.com

John Baker knows a thing or two about how dangerous it can be to drive on Alcoa Highway. He lives just off the four-lane road in south Knoxville.

“Depending on the time of day, it’s sometimes a kind of scary thing to pull out onto Alcoa Highway,” he says. “It is definitely sort of a hold-your-breath-and-punch-it kind of deal.”

Baker’s car is one of the estimated 47,000 vehicles Alcoa Highway handles every day. State transportation officials say they want to make the route connecting Knoxville and Maryville safer. They also say it will cost a lot of money.

wn.com

Just before lunchtime Monday, Knox County School Superintendent Jim McIntyre announced his resignation, which will take effect in July.

The decorations have been put away. The nights are long, and spring seems like a long way away. Now is a great time to chase away the winter blues with some good science books!

No, not those dense science textbooks from your school days. Books that bring the stories of science to life. As we close out 2015, Method host Brandon Hollingsworth and two previous guests suggest some great additions to your winter reading list.

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