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Are you looking for a locally-produced interview or feature story you heard on WUOT?  Try searching our archive.  At this point, it only goes back to 2012, but we're adding archival content every day.  If you can't find the piece you're looking for, try back in a week or email Director of News Content Matt Shafer Powell at

WUOT News, Matt Shafer Powell

In Nashville, conservative Republicans are in year five of a tense alliance with legislative leaders and a governor they sometimes accuse of being too moderate to get things done. And those same Republican leaders have had to put the brakes on legislation they deem too extreme or too unwise for state business.

On the presidential campaign trail, so-called establishment Republicans are grappling with what Donald Trump's rise means for their future. And Hillary and Bernie supporters are hurling insults at each other as much or more so than at their Republican opponent.

Tennessee Valley Authority

  This summer, perhaps thousands of people will spend part of their summer vacations using TVA lakes. Millions will depend on the utility's hydroelectric dams for power. And commercial barges will depend on the rivers and lakes in the Tennessee River watershed for navigation.

Education, highway paving, payroll expenses. Most of the money allocated in Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett's proposed FY 2017 budget is directed toward the necessities of county government and services.

"This budget isn't sexy," Burchett said in a morning budget announcement, "But that's the way it should be."

National Weather Service Morristown

Five years ago today, April 27, 2011, Tennessee and four other Southern states were ground zero for the largest tornado outbreak in American history. The Super Outbreak of 2011 produced a record number of tornadoes on a single day. In East Tennessee, 53 tornadoes killed 32 people and injured more than 300 others.

History is full of ironies. The U.S. Treasury launched a big one in 1928, when it selected Andrew Jackson to be the face of the twenty-dollar bill. How's that ironic? Andrew Jackson considered only precious metals such as gold and silver to have monetary value. He distrusted paper money and spent much of his presidency working to defeat a national banking system. Not exactly the poster boy for a bill that makes up 25 percent of the paper money printed in the United States this year.

WBMA Birmingham/ABC 33-40

If you grew up in the South, you grew up with tornadoes and tornado warnings. But you probably didn’t know there are some big differences between the tornadoes that happen here, and their Midwestern cousins. They’re typically deadlier. They’re harder to see. And they’re more likely to happen at night, an especially dangerous time.

Benjamin Benschneider

In her time, the ocean liner Lusitania was the finest ship to ply the Atlantic passenger route between New York and England. Her opulence and speed were well-known, and passage on the ship was considered near the height of luxury.

In eight years, Lusitania made 201 trips across the pond, sometimes setting new speed records for the transatlantic crossing. But her final voyage – number 202 – ended in tragedy, confusion and mysteries that linger to this day.

Jonathan Walton/Harvard University

About 40 years ago, Christian preachers in the U.S. started singing a seldom-heard hymn: God rewards the wealthy. It’s called the prosperity gospel, and though its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth century, it was the rise of televangelism in the 1970s and '80s that lofted prosperity theology to a wide audience.

via Flickr/Creative Commons

Tennessee voters will head to the polls on primary day, Tuesday, March 1. Gone are the paper ballots of decades past – the process is virtually all electronic now. So what happens once you press the button that records your ballot? Where does the information go? To find out, Matt Shafer Powell spoke with Chris Davis of the Knox County Election Commission.

Three years ago, an edition of Dialogue focused on the Affordable Care Act and its effects in Tennessee. Much of what the panel discussed that day in 2013 was speculative, because many of the ACA’s provisions hadn’t taken effect.

Now, consumers, doctors, hospitals and insurers are dealing with the effects – both good and bad – of the controversial law known as “Obamacare.” In this edition of Dialogue, we re-visit the ACA, health insurance and more.