Search WUOT News Archive

Are you looking for a locally-produced interview or feature story you heard on WUOT?  Try searching our archive.  At this point, it only goes back to 2012, but we're adding archival content every day.  If you can't find the piece you're looking for, try back in a week or email Director of News Content Matt Shafer Powell at mattshaferpowell@tennessee.edu

http://blogs.longwood.edu/wilmouth400/files/2014/02/budget.jpg

Today is the first day of the 2015 and 16 fiscal year… and we have a snapshot of the budgets for the City of Knoxville and for Knox County.

Mayor Madeline Rogero sat down with WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper to discuss the new $206 million budget for the City of Knoxville, which is heavy on funding for infrastructure, including sidewalks for the city’s neighborhoods…

 

The Appalachian Shakespeare Project aims to use classic literature to tell Appalachian stories. This year, the project is William Shakespeare's As You Like It.

Natalie Spar is Assistant Professor of English and Mark McGinley, Assistant Professor of Theatre at Lincoln Memorial University. They sat down with WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper to talk about why they chose that particular Shakespeare play…

https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/512627590209605632/3B-s08QB.png

We hear about technology conferences all the time, the gatherings held for developers and entrepreneurs in the tech industry. They've led to some of the most innovative products for tech consumers, and we have a conference coming up in July, right here in Knoxville. 

freedomtomarry.org

At 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time this morning, the Supreme Court of the United States declared same-sex marriage bans unconstitutional. Marriage equality advocates hailed the decision as a victory for the nation, while opponents described the ruling as a misapplication of judicial power.

Regardless of your stance on the matter, today's decision was a watershed moment in American history. Part of that history was forged here in East Tennessee. Plaintiffs Val Tanco and Sophy Jesty were one of the couples that challenged Tennessee's same-sex marriage ban.

Kathryn King/Y-12

Sending humans into space is a relatively recent achievement of the species. Yet, the half-century since Yuri Gagarin's historic one-orbit flight has seen manned space flight go from extraordinary to routine, a startling evolution.

In this edition of The Method, we examine what we can learn from the space program, even in its less-glorious years.

Sociologist Lindsey Freeman grew up in Oak Ridge. As she got older, she began to wonder how her city told its own story. She noticed, for instance, that local museums exalted the people and ideas that shaped atomic warfare, but paid little attention to nuclear opposition. Her story of Oak Ridge and its struggle to present its unique history is the subject of a new book, Longing for the Bomb: Oak Ridge and Atomic Nostalgia.

The Knoxville Museum of Art is showing the first major US exhibition of Evan Roth, who calls himself a "hacktivist" artist. WUOT's Chrissy Keuper spoke with Stephen Wicks, the KMA's Barbara W. and Bernard E. Bernstein Curator, about Roth's show...

University of Alabama Cartographic Research Library

On June 1, 1796, the federal government of the United States took a narrow strip of territory from the Appalachians to the Mississippi River and called it the State of Tennessee. But most of that land still belonged to American Indians. As late as 1825, maps still labeled the southeastern parts of Tennessee, around what is now Chattanooga and as far north as Athens, as “Cherokee Lands.”

The focus of each edition of The Method is how science affects our lives. We give that theme special focus this month, with three stories that show how people use science and related fields to tackle interesting issues in their lives, and ours.

Chrissy Keuper speaks with two researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. They study the state of America's hydroelectric power sources.

Brandon Hollingsworth meets Vinny Cevasco, an Ohio high schooler who came to Knoxville last week to learn how to tackle problems using science, technology and design.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

It's often been said that numbers don't lie. Perhaps not, but that doesn't mean they always tell the truth.

Tennessee's unemployment rate has been stuck above the national average for quite some time, despite improvements in the job market in the wake of the recession. The state jobless rate for March, for instance, clocked in at 6.3 percent, with the national average at 5.5 percent. But that doesn't necessarily mean Tennessee is beset by a mysterious economic force that depresses hiring.

Pages