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Are you looking for a locally-produced interview or feature story you heard on WUOT?  Try searching our archive.  At this point, it only goes back to 2012, but we're adding archival content every day.  If you can't find the piece you're looking for, try back in a week or email Director of News Content Matt Shafer Powell at mattshaferpowell@tennessee.edu

University of Alabama Cartographic Research Library

On June 1, 1796, the federal government of the United States took a narrow strip of territory from the Appalachians to the Mississippi River and called it the State of Tennessee. But most of that land still belonged to American Indians. As late as 1825, maps still labeled the southeastern parts of Tennessee, around what is now Chattanooga and as far north as Athens, as “Cherokee Lands.”

The focus of each edition of The Method is how science affects our lives. We give that theme special focus this month, with three stories that show how people use science and related fields to tackle interesting issues in their lives, and ours.

Chrissy Keuper speaks with two researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. They study the state of America's hydroelectric power sources.

Brandon Hollingsworth meets Vinny Cevasco, an Ohio high schooler who came to Knoxville last week to learn how to tackle problems using science, technology and design.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

It's often been said that numbers don't lie. Perhaps not, but that doesn't mean they always tell the truth.

Tennessee's unemployment rate has been stuck above the national average for quite some time, despite improvements in the job market in the wake of the recession. The state jobless rate for March, for instance, clocked in at 6.3 percent, with the national average at 5.5 percent. But that doesn't necessarily mean Tennessee is beset by a mysterious economic force that depresses hiring.

http://www.childrensdefense.org/about/leadership/marian-wright-edelman/

Marian Wright Edelman is a civil rights activist and attorney; she was the first African-American woman admitted to the Mississippi Bar; and in 1973, she founded the Children’s Defense Fund. She was in Knoxville recently and she told WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper that the civil rights movement in this country has never ended…  

http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/84f241b0835bc92f968fbd17d056689cf9326650/c=0-93-1152-1633&r=537&c=0-0-534-712/local/-/media/Nashville/2014/03/26/-murbrd02-02-2014dnj1b00120140201img-19991019.jpg11q46b4cg4l3.jpg

The Tennessee Supreme Court is hearing arguments on whether death row inmates can challenge the constitutionality of electrocution as a method of execution. The hearings stem from a lawsuit against the state by 34 death row inmates.

nps.gov

Knoxville and the communities that surround the Great Smoky Mountains have been dealing with dreadfully poor air quality for generations.  

In recent years, however, the news has actually been encouraging.

A combination of tighter restrictions on air polluters and the migration away from coal as a fuel source by utilities like the TVA means the air is actually cleaner and healthier here than it has been in decades.   

http://profiles.spia.vt.edu/wdunaway/

Wilma Dunaway studied sociology at the University of Tennessee, is a professor at Virginia Tech, and is a specialist on how post-Civil War Appalachia became part of global capitalism. Dunaway told WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper that her knowledge of Appalachia came from studies of economic and political systems all over the world… 

NASA

If all you know about the dwarf planet Pluto is that it’s small, cold and very far away, well, you’re not alone. Since its discovery in 1930, Pluto has refused to give up much information. Even the best images from the Hubble Space Telescope show little more than a small dot with orange and black smudges on it.

http://www.insurancejournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/tennessee-state-capitol-building.jpg

WUOT's Chrissy Keuper and Tom Humphrey discuss the latest events in the Tennessee legislature... The Tennessee General Assembly has now adjourned for the session.

Nissa Dahiln-Brown, Howard Baker Center for Public Policy

How dangerous is Deborah Jones' job? So dangerous that she has been working out of another country for nearly a year.

The U.S. Ambassador to Libya is based in Malta, mainly over safety concerns. From there and many other locations around the Mediterranean, Jones works to bring together the various factions fighting for resources and political control in Libya.

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