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Are you looking for a locally-produced interview or feature story you heard on WUOT?  Try searching our archive.  At this point, it only goes back to 2012, but we're adding archival content every day.  If you can't find the piece you're looking for, try back in a week or email Director of News Content Matt Shafer Powell at mattshaferpowell@tennessee.edu

Clarence Brown Theatre

Of all the themes that haunt Arthur Miller's classic play The Crucible, none seems more powerful or destructive as fear.   Set during the Salem Witch Trials of the 1680's, it is Miller's depiction of primal fear that drives ordinary people to commit heinous acts of treachery, seclusion and murder.  

Mark Davis, Getty Images

The saying goes, the camera doesn't lie. But cameras don't snap images on their own. They're operated by people, and those people bring their own feelings, backgrounds, philosophies and biases to the process of documenting life. The result, says Thomas Allen Harris, tells us about the photographer, the subject and ultimately, the viewer.

"I tell my students, you could show 50 people the same photograph, and they could come up with 50 different interpretations," Harris says.

Charlene Hipsher has a unique vantage point from which to witness East Tennessee's addiction crisis.

From her position as Executive Assistant to Roane County Prosecutor Russell Johnson, Hipsher sees a daily flow of opiate addicts surging through the courts.   

  These are people she knows.  From families she knows.  She says it's heartbreaking to see.  

"I'm talking to those parents who are not so different from me," Hipsher says, "and they're burying their kids." 

It’s an election year for the ages. Political animosity divides the government and pits former allies against one another. A fierce battle develops over the nation’s economic future. And tensions over the balance between state and federal power nearly tips into armed conflict.

The year is not 2016, but 1832. Andrew Jackson was the man in the White House, and it was a volatile year of his presidency. The University of Tennessee’s Jackson Papers Project has just released a volume of documents, many from Jackson's own hand, covering 1832.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

If you’ve used the free, official highway map of Tennessee, you have Bob Boutiette to thank. From his tenth-floor office at the Tennessee Department of Transportation in Nashville, Boutiette helps edit and update the state map issued each year. And it starts with Post-It notes.

“It just so happens that...over on my desk, I have a 2015 state map with sticky notes on it," Boutiette says. "Because that’s the best way to really keep track of [changes and errors].”

Matt Shafer Powell, WUOT News

Unmanned space probes and rovers are impressive feats of engineering, and they take great photos, but there’s something missing. The last time humans brought back a piece of the place they visited was during the Apollo program, nearly 45 years ago. Now, NASA is ready to embark on a mission that will swoop down close to the surface of an asteroid called Bennu. A long arm of the spacecraft will scoop up soil and rocks, and fly back to Earth.

  Photographer and writer Reed Massengill is knee-deep in the research for a new book about film director Clarence Brown. One of Brown’s silent films, Smouldering Fires, will be shown on Saturday, August 20, as part of the East Tennessee History Fair.

Massengill’s path to the pioneering filmmaker’s story began twenty years ago, when he was writing a book about Byron de la Beckwith, the Mississippi man that murdered civil rights leader Medgar Evers.

  On August 8, 1863, Eliza Johnson, wife of Tennessee's military governor, made an unexpected announcement: The family's slaves were to be freed, in accordance with the Emancipation Proclamation issued earlier that year. The place was Greeneville, and the military governor was Andrew Johnson. Less than two years later, the former slave owner would be the man who would lead the nation through its earliest post-slavery era.

Four years ago this summer, Megan Rice, Greg Boertje-Obed and Michael Walli broke into the Y-12 nuclear security facility in Oak Ridge. They were there to protest America's nuclear weapons stockpiles. Their stunt shocked the government and thrilled anti-nuclear activists.

Rice, Walli and Boertje-Obed sit at the center of Washington Post reporter Dan Zak's new book, Almighty, which traces the history of nuclear opposition. Zak spoke with WUOT All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

  This weekend, Tennessee held its annual sales tax holiday. School-related items, including electronics and clothing, will be free of state sales taxes. Sixteen other states hold similar "tax holidays," on items ranging from hurricane preparedness supplies (Alabama) to firearms (Louisiana). But while the holiday weekends are politically popular, their economic benefits appear to be slim.

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