Search WUOT News Archive

Are you looking for a locally-produced interview or feature story you heard on WUOT?  Try searching our archive.  At this point, it only goes back to 2012, but we're adding archival content every day.  If you can't find the piece you're looking for, try back in a week or email Director of News Content Matt Shafer Powell at mattshaferpowell@tennessee.edu

Albert C. Goodyear

Archaeology is by definition the story of the past. But what we learn from it is quite often new and unexpected. Case in point: archaeological studies of Native American communities in the South that predate European exploration, or even the invention of written language. Anthropologist David Anderson will talk about what’s new in Southern archaeology at the University of Tennessee’s Pregame Showcase on November 7.

Matt Shafer Powell, WUOT News

At Maryville College, two of the picnic tables outside the student dining hall might look a little odd to you. It's because they've been outfitted with umbrella-like shades that contain solar panels.

The energy the panels produce goes into charging stations built into the picnic shelters, so students have the opportunity to soak up the sun while their devices charge. But students have been getting way more out of the picnic tables than a fully-charged smartphone.

Jonathan Brown converted to Islam almost twenty years ago. He's spent much of his adult life studying the history, evolution and scholarship of the religion that claims more than a billion adherents around the world. On Tuesday, October 27, Brown, a Georgetown University professor, delivered the University of Tennessee College of Religious Studies' annual Siddiqi Lecture in Islamic Studies.

 Samuel Barber's musical interpretation of the James Agee prose poem Knoxville: Summer of 1915 is considered one of Barber's master works and is especially popular here in East Tennessee.  

Prepare for the sequel.

This Friday, the University of Tennessee Symphony Orchestra will debut Knoxville: Summer of 2015, composed by Oak Ridge native Ellen Reid. 

Interview: Historian Kate Brown On "Plutopias"

Oct 15, 2015
http://www.atomicarchive.com/History/sites/T_plant.shtml

Kate Brown is a professor of history at the University of Maryland and specializes in the history of the Soviet Union.

Allen Institute for Brain Science

As America’s baby boomers continue to age, Alzheimer’s disease becomes a greater concern for the health care system, lawmakers and the public. It’s the sixth-leading cause of death among people 65 and older. It’s estimated that 110,000 Tennesseans suffer from Alzheimer’s and its effects, and that number is projected to increase more than 27 percent over the next ten years. And there is no cure.

Elizabeth Aaron

 John Steinbeck's classic Of Mice and Men was nearly called something else.

The working title for Steinbeck's dark tale of drifters looking for work in Depression-era California was Something That Happened. The author wanted to emphasize the idea that some things transpire without the grand, overarching themes common in literature.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

Tennessee’s state park rangers aren’t in the business just because they get to wear cool hats. Many of them are trained in the natural sciences, such as biology or geology. Method host Brandon Hollingsworth visits with Fall Creek Falls State Park ranger Matt Brown. He talks about sharing his love of science with the public.

http://www.knoxlib.org/about/support-library/library-foundation/papers-pixels-campaign

The Knox County Public Library is partnering with NewsBank to create a digital archive of the Knoxville News Sentinel, for the years 1922 through 1990. The project is called From Papers to Pixels, and the library is in the midst of a huge fundraising campaign to pay for the result.

Finding Patterns In The History Of Human Warfare

Sep 16, 2015
http://media-1.web.britannica.com/eb-media/99/98299-004-E4DC6E2D.jpg

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