The Next Wave Radio Project

WUOT’s Next Wave Radio Project gives the brightest and most ambitious college students an opportunity to experience public radio journalism from the inside.  Most Next Wave students at WUOT serve the station as staff reporters, covering events, researching stories, recording and editing interviews and writing news copy for air.   At the same time, we’re able to introduce another generation to the passion that drives public radio. 

Below, you'll find radio stories produced by some of our distinguished Next Wave alumni.   Who knows?  Maybe one of them will be the next Audie Cornish or Steve Inskeep. 

(If you're interested in learning more about this challenging, rewarding and fun opportunity, contact Matt Shafer Powell at mattshaferpowell@tennessee.edu)

Celeste de la Rosa- Turning A Disability Into An Opportunity

Aug 22, 2013
WUOT File Photo: Matt Shafer Powell

The job interview can be an intimidating experience even for the most prepared and confident candidate, but a job seeker with a disability faces an even greater set of challenges.  They have to show the employer they can do the job, but they also have to overcome any fears and assumptions the employer may have about working with someone who has a disability.  As part of our Next Wave Radio Project, WUOT’s Celeste de la Rosa looks into how some of those job candidates are turning their disabilities into opportunities... 

Lauren Blankenship- Arithmomania Has Twelve Letters

May 16, 2013

Unless you spend a lot of time doing crossword puzzles or tweeting, counting the number of letters in a word might seem like a pointless endeavor.  But for a tiny segment of the population, the urge to count letters is irresistible, sometimes to the point of distraction.  WUOT’s Lauren Blankenship knows a lot about counting letters.  She's been doing it since she could read.  As part of WUOT's Next Wave Radio Project, Lauren filed this reflection...

Katharine Lusky- Pilots 'n' Paws

May 9, 2013

The U.S. Census Bureau says more than 4 million pets are euthanized each year in America because there’s not enough space in shelters. Here in Knox County, the Young-Williams Animal Center had to euthanize more than 60% of the animals they housed last year. But a national charity with roots in Knoxville is trying to change that. Airplane pilots working for the group "Pilots ‘n’ Paws" donate their planes, time and money to fly these animals to people who want to adopt them.

Madeline Brown- Circus Class

May 9, 2013

The Knox County Commission recently approved a $7 million increase in funding for the county school system. Some of that money is earmarked for a program known as the Community Schools Initiative. This collaboration between the county, the University of Tennessee and the United Way attempts to provide poorer schools with a variety of services and techniques to help disadvantaged students learn basic skills.

Missy La Vone- The Healing Farm

May 9, 2013

For more than a million Americans every year, a cancer diagnosis becomes a transformative experience. For Leaf Myczack of Rockwood, it was a catalyst to a healthier, happier life. As part of WUOT’s Next Wave Radio Project, Missy La Vone has the story of a man who declined conventional treatment when he discovered the path to his recovery meanders right through his East Tennessee farm.

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