Morning Edition on WUOT

Weekdays from 5-9 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition. We bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. 

In addition to news from NPR, each weekday morning includes:
WUOT News at 6:20, 6:43, 7:20, 7:43, 8:20 and 8:43
Marketplace Morning Report at 6:51 and 8:51 
StarDate at 8:58

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Museum's 1770s Artifact Smells Of Rum

Nov 23, 2016
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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Where Is America's Best Bathroom?

Nov 22, 2016
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For more than a hundred years, Vigo County, Indiana has consistently voted for the winning president. It chose Barack Obama twice, and then picked Donald Trump this November. In fact, the county is a remarkably accurate bellwether; it's only been wrong two times since the 1890s.

Why does Vigo County almost always predict the winner?

There are many hypotheses, none of which fully explain this quirky mystery of why a small region in southwest Indiana (a reliably Republican state) routinely jumps from Democrat to Republican in presidential years.

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