The Method

The Method is a series that explores the intersection of science and society. In modern journalism, science reporting often repeats the material in press releases or studies without engaging in the critical thinking that defines the scientific method. The Method will look at science through a different lens. How does scientific research affect you and your community? That's the story we hope to share with you. 

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Ed Yourdon

In this edition of The Method:

You might use social media to tell your friends what you had for lunch, or share photos of your dog. But scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using social media and other datasets to track infectious and chronic diseases. WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper spoke with Laura Pullum, a senior researcher working on this effort.

Heather Fritts, McClung Museum

This month on The Method, Brandon Hollingsworth meets a group of kids studying rocks, fossils and geologic time at the McClung Museum. What's it like to be dinosaur? We'll find out from the children themselves.

Then, Chrissy Keuper speaks with Jerry Tuskan, an ORNL scientist studying ways to extract fuel from eucalyptus plants. He'll tell us how the process might work.

Point Five Digital

Imagine walking through your local mall and finding, amid the stores and food courts, a science museum. That's what happened to Brandon Hollingsworth recently. For this month's edition of The Method, Brandon returned to that exhibit, called SPECTRUM, and went inside this portable museum of solar power.

http://www.tennessean.com/assets/gif/DN112759714.GIF

In this month's edition of The Method, Matt Shafer Powell looks at how the Tennessee Valley Authority's effort to adjust to new realities of the energy market is also helping clean up East Tennessee's air.

Then, Chrissy Keuper marks the silver anniversary of the Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance.

East Tennessee State University

This month's edition of The Method involves a little time travel. But don't worry; we'll take only eight minutes of your time.

First, Brandon's off to the Gray Fossil Site in Washington County. Miocene-epoch fossils found there have painted an incredible picture of life in East Tennessee five million years ago. Two paleontologists will tell us what makes Gray special.

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