The Method

The Method is a series that explores the intersection of science and society. In modern journalism, science reporting often repeats the material in press releases or studies without engaging in the critical thinking that defines the scientific method. The Method will look at science through a different lens. How does scientific research affect you and your community? That's the story we hope to share with you. 

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NASA

And just like that, another year is in the books. 2014 marked The Method's first full year on the air, and twelve times, Brandon, Chrissy and Matt brought you stories of the ways science affects our lives. In this special look back on the year that was, Brandon and Chrissy share some of their favorite stories from 2014.

Encyclopedia Britannica

The Department of Energy’s reservation in Oak Ridge is home to a variety of wild animals, including turkeys. But it wasn’t always that way. Matt Shafer Powell talks with a man who helped bring the turkeys back.

And Chrissy Keuper speaks with ORNL researcher Raymond Borges about his work designing cybersecurity systems.

Tennessee Valley Authority

Automakers decided to meet fuel economy standards by making new gasoline direct-injected engines. But scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered those engines may be bigger polluters than current motors, generating as much as ten times more particulate matter, or soot. ORNL researcher John Storey talks with WUOT's Chrissy Keuper.

At the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant in Rhea County, one man is paid to figure out how to destroy the reactors...and then keep it from happening. Brandon Hollingsworth meets him.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Here in East Tennessee, our thoughts turn to sunny days and cool nights as autumn sets in. But you might be surprised to learn September is typically the peak month for tropical weather, including hurricanes. Today, meteorologists use all kinds of modern tools to track hurricanes from start to finish. University of Tennessee researcher Kelsey Scheitlin goes a different route.

Ed Yourdon

In this edition of The Method:

You might use social media to tell your friends what you had for lunch, or share photos of your dog. But scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using social media and other datasets to track infectious and chronic diseases. WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper spoke with Laura Pullum, a senior researcher working on this effort.

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