The Method

The Method is a series that explores the intersection of science and society. In modern journalism, science reporting often repeats the material in press releases or studies without engaging in the critical thinking that defines the scientific method. The Method will look at science through a different lens. How does scientific research affect you and your community? That's the story we hope to share with you. 

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Science and Society
6:00 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

The Method: Migrating Trees, Radiochemistry and Preventing Blackouts

A TVA helicopter used to monitor power transmission lines from the air.
Credit Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

This go 'round on The Method,  a scientist at Oak Ridge National Lab is working to predict how climate change will affect Tennessee's forests and possibly the 39,000 jobs they provide. Then, Chrissy Keuper interviews the new head of the University of Tennessee's radiochemistry lab. And ten years after the nation's biggest blackout, we look at how TVA is trying to prevent the next major power failure.

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Science and Society
6:00 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

The Method: Primitive Art and AIDS in Appalachia

A scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding (in green) from a cultured lymphocyte
Credit wikimedia commons

This month on The Method, we examine two interesting fields of research - one rooted in the distant past; the other looking to the near future. Chrissy Keuper interviews Dr. Jan Simek about how archaeologists study some of the oldest cave art in North America. In the second portion of the program, Brandon Hollingsworth talks to researcher Joanne Hall about a first-of-a-kind study on end-of-life care for AIDS patients in Appalachia.

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Science and Society
6:00 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

The Method: Bees and Batteries

Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientist Jianlin Li shows a typical lithium-ion battery. Such batteries power smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices.
Credit Christine Jessel, WUOT News

This go 'round on WUOT's The Method, Christine Jessel talks to researchers who are trying to give batteries a boost. That could mean cheaper goods and more power in your electronic devices. Then, Brandon Hollingsworth sits down with University of Tennessee entomologist John Skinner to find out what could explain the mysterious disappearance of bees in North America and Europe.

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Science and Society
6:22 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

The Method: Bats, Edison and Galactic Opera

Thomas Edison in 1878, a year before he patented the incandescent bulb.
Credit Library of Congress

In this installment of WUOT's The Method, Brandon Hollingsworth talks with author Ernest Freeberg about Thomas Edison's greatest invention: Modern America. Chrissy Keuper speaks with a biologist about the fungal infection threatening bat populations across the country. And we find the common ground between Edwin Hubble and Giuseppe Verdi.

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