Dialogue on WUOT

The first Wednesday of the month, noon - 1:00 p.m. ET

WUOT's monthly live call-in program; hosted by a member of WUOT's News Staff 

We'll take your calls at 865-974-5050; tweet us @WUOTFM or submit your question on WUOT's Facebook page. 

Four years ago, the shooting of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, helped launch a national debate about how law enforcement deals with minority communities. Similar conversations have arisen, over how we talk about and implement racial diversity in workplaces, government, media and daily life.

In this episode of Dialogue, a look at race and systemic racism in America. Do minorities find themselves at a disadvantage when seeking better employment, housing, or justice? What efforts have been made to combat racism embedded in institutions, and have they been successful?

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After Harvey Weinstein was accused of sexual assault last October, many women came forward with their own stories about powerful figures and unsavory behavior. Prominent men in television, classical music, politics, and even public radio, saw their careers crumble as allegations poured forth. On this Dialogue, "Conduct and Consequences," a look at the national conversation over sexual misconduct.

Knoxville’s zoning ordinances haven’t been fully reviewed in about 50 years. But in that time the entire country has seen a rise in urbanization, as more people than ever are returning to cities.

In this edition of Dialogue, an in-depth look at Recode, Knoxville’s review of old ordinances, and the effort to bring those codes into the modern age.

 

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

President Trump has a rocky relationship with the reporters who cover his administration. But he's not the first chief executive to struggle with the press. On this edition of Dialogue, we hear about the history of the White House press corps and its dynamics with the president.

In early September, President Trump announced he wanted to end DACA, an Obama Administration policy that deferred deportation for certain undocumented immigrants. Trump passed the topic to Congress, urging lawmakers to formalize the policy into federal law or take on other immigration-related issues. While the announcement was met with some bipartisan support, whether Congress will indeed approve DACA is unclear.

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