All Things Considered on WUOT

Weekdays from 4-6:30 p.m.

All Things Considered features in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  

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Music News
5:14 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Musicians, Take Note: Your Instrument May Be Contraband

Antique bows were often made with a small piece of ivory that clamps the bow hairs onto the wood.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

New Obama administration rules aimed at protecting African elephants are causing widespread anxiety in the music world. From country to classical, working musicians say the policy will make them think twice about touring abroad.

The proposed regulations would place a near-total ban on anything made with ivory moving in and out of the U.S.

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All Tech Considered
5:09 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Silicon Valley Buying Spree: A Tech Bubble, Or Strategy At Play?

Are we in a tech bubble about to burst? Facebook bought WhatsApp for $19 billion earlier this year. WhatsApp CEO Jan Koum speaks during a conference at the Mobile World Congress 2014 in Spain.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 9:22 am

Over the past few months, the country's biggest technology firms have spent billions buying startups. Are we watching another tech bubble about to burst?

In this year's first quarter, Google and Facebook, alone, announced deals worth more than $24 billion on little companies that have almost no revenue. Those deals seem to have spooked Wall Street; last week, technology stocks plunged and the tech-heavy Nasdaq index fell nearly 1.2 percent Monday.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:23 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Two Leads, Two Deaths In 18 Hours

Kristine Opolais made her Madama Butterfly debut as Cio-Cio-San, only to get a last-minute call to play Mimi in La Boheme.
Marty Sohl Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Over the weekend, soprano Kristine Opolais sang her heart out — and died twice.

Friday evening she had sung the lead in Puccini's Madama Butterfly. It was her debut in that role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. It was a big deal. Opolais was so excited about it that she stayed up until five the next morning.

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From Our Listeners
4:23 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Letters: Athletic And Academic Demands In College

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Melissa Block and Audie Cornish read letters from listeners about the demands made on students and student-athletes in college.

News
4:23 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Deep-Sea Ping May Lead To Malaysian Jet — But Time's Running Out

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Earlier today, Australian authorities said they may have a signal from the missing Malaysian airliner that disappeared a month ago on its way to Beijing. A ship far out in the Indian Ocean has picked up a signal that could be from the missing airliner's black boxes. Investigators need those boxes to determine what happened to Malaysian Air Flight 370.

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Shots - Health News
7:31 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

How Public Health Advocates Are Trying To Reach Nonvaccinators

A school nurse prepares a vaccine against whooping cough before giving it to students at Mark Twain Middle School in Los Angeles.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:54 am

Whooping cough made a comeback in California last year, which researchers have linked to vaccine refusals. And with new measles outbreaks in Southern California, New York and British Columbia, the debate over vaccination is also spreading.

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World
6:50 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

Fighting For Rwanda's Justice In France

Rwandan genocide-hunter Dafroza Gauthier on February 4, 2014 at the opening of the trial of Pascal Simbikangwa, Rwanda's former intelligence chief, charged with complicity in the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
MARTIN BUREAU AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 8:00 pm

For more than a decade, Dafroza Gauthier and her husband, Alain, have hunted perpetrators of the 1994 Rwandan genocide. More than 800,000 people were killed in the genocide, most of them members of the Tutsi ethnic group.

Earlier this month, the couple gave testimony against former Rwandan intelligence chief Pascal Simbikangwa in Paris. On March 14, Simbikangwa was sentenced to 25 years in prison for complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity. His was the first Rwandan genocide trial to take place in France.

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Author Interviews
5:40 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

In Book's Trial Of U.S. Justice System, Wealth Gap Is Exhibit A

Courtesy of Random House

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:56 pm

Investigative journalist and author Matt Taibbi has long reported on American politics and business. With an old-school muckraker's nose for corruption, he examined the events leading up to the 2008 financial crisis in Griftopia. With Gonzo zeal, he described a two-party political system splintered into extreme factions in The Great Derangement.

And in his newest book, Taibbi sets out to explain what he thinks is a strange state of affairs:

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Media
4:59 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

The Growing Industry Of Marijuana Advertising

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:50 pm

In Humboldt County, radio stations broadcast gardening ads geared toward the Emerald Triangle's most lucrative — but still federally illegal — industry: marijuana. NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with broadcast lawyer Harry Cole about the legality of advertising pot and related growing products.

Around the Nation
4:59 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

FBI Raids Indiana Man's Private Collection Of Historical Artifacts

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:50 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Again, you're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Kelly McEvers.

In rural Indiana, FBI agents are working to remove thousands of cultural artifacts from one man's private collection. The items range from arrowheads to shrunken heads to a fully preserved skeleton. But investigators say the 91-year-old collector may have violated international treaties and federal laws when he bought or transported some of these artifacts. Sarah Whitmeyer of member station WFIU has the story.

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