All Things Considered on WUOT

All Things Considered features in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Tereza Lee is 35 years old, a married mother of two, a concert pianist and the inspiration behind something we have heard a lot about lately - the DREAM Act, the effort to provide legal status to undocumented young people.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Tereza Lee is 35 years old, a married mother of two, a concert pianist and the inspiration behind something we have heard a lot about lately - the DREAM Act, the effort to provide legal status to undocumented young people.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Tereza Lee is 35 years old, a married mother of two, a concert pianist and the inspiration behind something we have heard a lot about lately - the DREAM Act, the effort to provide legal status to undocumented young people.

The order came in April. China's government instructed farmers in the country's northeastern breadbasket region to grow more soybeans, calling it "a political priority."

But soybean fields lay empty in the village of Sandaogou, which means "Three Ditches," in Liaoning province. It has been a dry spring.

"We've had a drought this year, so we planted soybeans late. The seedlings should be out by now. We need more rain," says farmer Liu, who only gives her surname for fear of trouble with local authorities. Soy, after all, has become "political."

A recording of migrant children crying for their mothers and fathers has gripped the nation — and ratcheted up the debate over the Trump administration's policy of separating families at the border.

Pages