Victor Agreda, Jr.

Morning Edition Host/Producer

Victor Agreda comes to WUOT with 10 years of experience in the media field, managing DownloadSquad, Engadget Spanish, Autoblog Spanish, DIYLife, and The Unofficial Apple Weblog for AOL. During his time at TUAW, Victor tested thousands of apps, and worked closely with developers and innovators in the technology field.

Victor holds degrees from the University of Tennessee (English) as well as Watkins in Nashville (Film Editing). Victor has created content for television and the web, and has been a speaker at SXSW and 360 Intersect, and has been interviewed on BBC Radio and Fox Business News.

Victor’s passion lies in storytelling and empowering local businesses and individuals in the region. Victor lives in Fountain City, and has two teenage children, Belle and Weston.

Knoxville’s recent tech upgrades to streetlights, parking meters and some traffic lights represent the tentative first steps towards creating a smart city. The technology is designed to make streets safer, and serve the community better with more parking and less congestion. I spoke to Jeffrey Branham, Chief Traffic Engineer for the city, about those initiatives and what the future might hold in store.

Elaine Weiss is the author of The Woman's Hour: The Great Fight To Win The Vote. Despite knowing how it ends -- women can obviously vote today -- it's a gripping tale of how Tennessee played a pivotal role in the path to women's suffrage. While history books leave out the many interconnected issues leading up to the ratification of the 19th Amendment, Weiss connects the many dots by examining the roles of three key players in the movement. A movement that spanned 70 years and took the nation from the 19th into the 20th century.  Ratification passed by a single vote.

Four years ago, the shooting of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, helped launch a national debate about how law enforcement deals with minority communities. Similar conversations have arisen, over how we talk about and implement racial diversity in workplaces, government, media and daily life.

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