Melony Dodson

Morning Concert Host/Producer

Melony calls the beautiful mountains of Boone, N.C., home, although she was born near Greensboro, N.C. There’s just something about those Blue Ridge Mountains that got in her blood and never left after she moved there to attend Appalachian State University (ASU). While at ASU, she majored in piano performance and music therapy and began to cultivate a love for accompanying and for collaborating with other musicians. This soon led her to earn a master’s degree in collaborative piano at the University of Tennessee, which she attended from 2006-2008.

While a graduate student, she worked at WUOT as a student announcer, hosting Saturday afternoons and evenings. Melony rapidly developed another passion: that of being a radio personality/host. Soon after graduating, she began hosting weekend mornings, including the Early Morning Concert, and produced the highly popular Top 60 for 60, a special series commemorating WUOT’s 60th anniversary. Two years later, she was honored to become the new host of the Morning Concert, of which she is currently the host and producer. Melony is also a choral accompanist for the UT School of Music’s Concert Choir and the Men’s Chorale. In her spare time, Melony loves to music-direct musicals. She is secretly (or perhaps not so secretly!) obsessed with the musicals of Stephen Sondheim and Jason Robert Brown. She also loves to travel, cook, hike and explore all of the cultural (and food!) attractions Knoxville has to offer.

Ways to Connect

On Sunday, November 19th at 2:30pm, pianists David and Stephanie Northington will present a recital of music by Bach, Schubert, Beethoven, and Schubert. The concert is free and open to the public and will be given in the nave of the Church Street United Methodist Church on Henley Street in downtown Knoxville as part of the church's "Master Arts Series."  Works to be performed on the recital include Bach's "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring", Beethoven's Piano Sonata in G Major, Op.14, Franz Schubert's Fantaisie in F minor, Op.103, and selected Mazurkas by Frederic Chopin.

It's finally here--the release of the Big Ears Festival's 2018 lineup. Festival attendees will once again be transported to another world, filled with music, film, and art that's refreshing to the ears, the eyes, and the mind. The festival will, once again, take place over the span of four days (March 22-25) in most of the same downtown Knoxville venues as last year's event.  What is different is the focus on jazz and its subgenres, says Big Ears artistic director Ashley Capps.

In 1953, Dmitri Shostakovich broke the "curse of the 9th" by composing his tenth symphony. Widely regarded as his "greatest" symphony, Shostakovich was finally free to compose as he wished, as Stalin had died earlier that year and, along with him, his oppressive regime, which greatly restricted composers (along with other artists and musicians) with the music that they could create. Hidden within the work is a musical depiction of Stalin and cryptograms of Shostakovich's own name, as well as that of a suspected girlfriend.

The Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra and Chorus begins its 2017/2018 season with a concert featuring "playful" music. The program is diverse and entertaining and is sure to please.

Knoxville's Marble City Opera opens its 2017/2018 season with a double-bill, presenting two one-act operas, both incorporating the telephone as a main character. Soprano and artistic-director, Kathryn Frady, will star in Francis Poulenc's one-woman show, The Human Voice, while soprano, Julia Metry and baritone, Peter Johnson share the stage in Gian Carlo Menotti's The Telephone. Pianist, Brandon Coffer, will fulfill the role of "orchestra" on the piano. 

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