Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

Ways to Connect

Art for art's sake is a nice sentiment, but even the purest of artists has to eat. So you have to make a little money. But what's the line between artistic credibility and selling out? And does it matter? Those are some of the issues raised in Red, a play by John Logan at the Clarence Brown Theatre in Knoxville. Mark Rothko, a giant of mid-century art, wrestles with his own sense of artistic propriety as he struggles to complete a high-profile commission.  Michael Elich plays Rothko, Matt Leisy plays his assistant Ken, and John Sipes is the director of this production.

On January 15, senior judge Walter Kurtz ordered a re-trial for George Thomas, one of three defendants in the 2007 murders of Channon Christian and Christopher Newsom. Ringleader Lemaricus Davidson and his brother, Letalvis Cobbins, will not get new trials and their convictions will likely stand.

On Monday December 10, 2012, Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam made an important decision: The health insurance exchange required under the Affordable Care Act will be managed in Washington, not Tennessee. It may sound arcane, but it's a crucial choice as the nation prepares to change the way health insurance is offered, managed and sold.  Dr. Carole Myers is an associate professor in the University of Tennessee's College of Nursing.

Sometime in 2013, a team of researchers with the University of Tennessee plans to drill a series of wells into shale deep beneath the Cumberland Plateau as a testing ground for hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The controversial practice has been blamed with health problems and contaminated groundwater in other states. The UT test wells, planned for Morgan and Scott counties, will try to answer vital questions about the effects of fracking. Kevin Hoyt is the director of the University of Tennessee Forest Resources Ag Research and Education Center.

Nearly thirty years ago, Allen Coggins got a request from the director of the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency. He was told to compile a list of disasters that have affected the state since its creation. What neither Coggins nor the director knew was that the simple request would become a 27-year odyssey through dusty newspaper archives, libraries and eyewitness reports.

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