Brandon Hollingsworth

News Director

Brandon is WUOT’s news director. In that role, he oversees the station's daily news operations. He also hosts Dialogue and produces the biweekly series HealthConnections. For seven years, Brandon was WUOT's All Things Considered anchor. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and Morning Edition anchor at WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

Ways to Connect

City of Knoxville

An eight-person panel whose members have connections to Knoxville's arts, educational and business communities will examine potential changes to the city's World's Fair Park. Deputy to the Mayor Bill Lyons and UT professor Jan Simek will co-chair the exploratory committee that will look at options for the park that hosted the 1982 World’s Fair. The Knoxville News Sentinel reports one of those options is a new home for the Clarence Brown Theatre. The UT-based theater is in need of plumbing upgrades and more classroom space.

Before the TV shows, before the blockbuster comedy albums, before he ever told a single joke on stage, Bob Newhart was an accountant in suburban Chicago. It was there that he invented the signature stammering, deadpan delivery that would propel him along a fifty-year odyssey through comedy and our changing times. Newhart recently spoke with WUOT's All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth about the elements of comedy, what he's up to now and why he'll never retire from the stand-up circuit.
 

tva.com

Saturday May 18th marks an important anniversary in the history of the Tennessee River Valley.  It was on that date in 1933 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the bill that created the Tennessee Valley Authority.  Throughout those 80 years, the agency has been the focus of both glowing praise and fervent criticism, all while fighting for its existence in the halls of Congress. To mark the occasion of the 80th anniversary, WUOT’s Brandon Hollingsworth sat down with Pat Ezzell, the TVA's resident historian.

This week the FBI and IRS raided the headquarters of one of the country's largest private employers: Pilot Flying J. The chain operates more than 600 gas stations and convenience stores in 43 states. It's owned by billionaire Jimmy Haslam. Haslam also owns the Cleveland Browns and his brother is Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam, who owns shares in the company.  The company is accused of skimming money it promised to commercial customers through fuel rebates. WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth filed this report for NPR's All Things Considered.

Boston University

What is sin? What's the punishment for it? And who gets to decide? Historian of religion Paula Fredriksen studied some of the earliest writings of Judaism and Christianity to find out. And her new book, Sin: The Early History of an Idea, explores the first 400 years of sin as a concept of Western religion.

On February 18, in advance of her appearance at the David Dungan Memorial Lecture at the University of Tennessee, Fredriksen talked to WUOT All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth about the concept of sin, its origins and its evolution.

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