Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

Ways to Connect

A space probe called OSIRIS-Rex has the goal of unlocking some of the secrets surrounding asteroids, including those that could pose a hazard to Earth. The mission doesn't lift off until 2016, but its work is already well underway. Josh Emery is a planetary scientist at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, and a member of the OSIRIS-Rex team. On November 12, 2012, he described the mission's goals to WUOT's All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth. 

The most recent assessment of Tennessee's economy shows cautious optimism for 2013 and 2014. The Center for Business and Economic Research in Knoxville issued its fall economic outlook recently, projecting moderate growth for Tennessee in the new year. Matt Murray is the assistant director of CBER. On November 1, 2012 he joined WUOT's All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth to talk about the report's findings, and to give us a preview of next week's state budget hearings.

All four of East Tennessee's congressmen are up for re-election on November 6, 2012 and so is one of the state's two senators. Though the biggest campaign contributions this year are going to swing states, money is an essential part of every political race. WUOT's All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth looks at who's paying for the region's Congressional races, and what it means.

A lowly graduate assistant on the staff of an SEC football team is trying to figure out where he fits in, both on and off the field. He joins a book club to impress women, he carries the load of his coaching staff and he puts up with the menial tasks he's assigned in order to beat out a competitor for a plum coaching slot that's just opened up. And that's just the beginning of  Winning Plays, a new comedic novel from writer and Tennessee native Inman Majors.

Jeff Sharlet is a writer whose beat is belief and faith in America. His books have chronicled fundamentalist dogma in the nation's capital and Wiccan ceremonies in the nation's heartland. His most recent work is a collection of nonfiction essays called Sweet Heaven When I Die: Faith, Faithlessness and the Country In Between. It examines personal faith on a variety of levels in American culture.

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