Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

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tva.com

Saturday May 18th marks an important anniversary in the history of the Tennessee River Valley.  It was on that date in 1933 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the bill that created the Tennessee Valley Authority.  Throughout those 80 years, the agency has been the focus of both glowing praise and fervent criticism, all while fighting for its existence in the halls of Congress. To mark the occasion of the 80th anniversary, WUOT’s Brandon Hollingsworth sat down with Pat Ezzell, the TVA's resident historian.

This week the FBI and IRS raided the headquarters of one of the country's largest private employers: Pilot Flying J. The chain operates more than 600 gas stations and convenience stores in 43 states. It's owned by billionaire Jimmy Haslam. Haslam also owns the Cleveland Browns and his brother is Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam, who owns shares in the company.  The company is accused of skimming money it promised to commercial customers through fuel rebates. WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth filed this report for NPR's All Things Considered.

Boston University

What is sin? What's the punishment for it? And who gets to decide? Historian of religion Paula Fredriksen studied some of the earliest writings of Judaism and Christianity to find out. And her new book, Sin: The Early History of an Idea, explores the first 400 years of sin as a concept of Western religion.

On February 18, in advance of her appearance at the David Dungan Memorial Lecture at the University of Tennessee, Fredriksen talked to WUOT All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth about the concept of sin, its origins and its evolution.

In the autumn of 1963, just months after George Wallace delivered his "segregation now" speech, and almost a year before President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law, Tennessee Governor Frank Clement made a bold move. He established a state agency dedicated to fighting discrimination in housing, public services and employment. The Tennessee Human Rights Commission turns 50 this year, and its executive director Beverly Watts joined WUOT's All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth to talk about what the commission does, and what its future may hold.

An annual report from the University of Tennessee's Center for Business and Economic Research briefs the governor, lawmakers and the public on the condition of Tennessee's economy.

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