Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

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Politics
6:45 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Knox County Legislator Proposes Hemp Legalization

Credit Gregory Jordan, via Flickr

A Tennessee state senator wants the state to become the eleventh in the nation to legalize the growing of hemp. But he acknowledges it won't be easy.

Frank Niceley, who represents eastern Knox County, is proposing the legalization of growing hemp, mainly for industrial uses. Hemp can be used to make items ranging from medications to textiles and even plastics. But it's also a cousin of marijuana, and that connection could scare away legislative support.

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Education
6:12 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Haslam, Huffman Respond to Teacher Concerns

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam (left, gesturing) joins Knox County School Superintendent Jim McIntyre (center) and state Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman (right) for a teacher appreciation event at Bearden Elementary School, November 8, 2013.
Credit Submitted

On a visit to Bearden Elementary School on Friday, Governor Bill Haslam and Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman responded to frustrations over the state's teacher evaluation process. Citing teacher surveys and a Vanderbilt report, both men said teacher satisfaction is generally good in the state.

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Education
6:00 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Knox County Teachers Voice Frustrations

Knox County teachers and their supporters crowd the main hearing room at the City-County Building in downtown Knoxville, November 6, 2013.
Credit Lydia McCoy, Knoxville News Sentinel

About 25 Knox County educators and supporters lined up to address the Knox County Board of Education Wednesday night, and they weren't there to celebrate.

Many of the teachers aired their concerns about a number of issues, from new educational standards to the current teacher evaluation system. Several shared concerns that teacher morale is very low, and that the burdens now facing educators could discourage new teachers from entering the profession.

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Politics
6:00 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Knoxville Elections Likely to Draw Slim Crowd

Credit WUOT, Matt Shafer Powell

Don't be surprised if you mention Election Day and receive a blank stare in return. Knox County election officials are expecting low turnout for Tuesday's slate of five city council races. Only two of the five have drawn viable opponents.

The highest-profile race will be the fourth district, which covers North Knoxville. There, incumbent Nick Della Volpe will fight a challenge from Rick Staples. Della Volpe's call for city pension reform drew the ire of groups representing Knoxville's police and fire departments. Their frustration could translate into support for Staples.

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Government
6:00 am
Fri November 1, 2013

HHS Secretary to Visit Memphis

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.
Credit J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

The government official at the center of the healthcare website debacle will be in Tennessee today. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius will be in Memphis, where she will deliver remarks and take questions from reporters.

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Law
6:00 am
Thu October 31, 2013

Mishandled Evidence Casts DUI Cases Into Uncertainty

Credit http://www.tbi.tn.gov/

 State law enforcement officials are re-testing the evidence collected in nearly 3,000 DUI cases after a Tennessee Bureau of Investigation probe found some of the evidence was mishandled.

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Politics
6:00 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Knoxville Attorney Joins Race for Alexander Senate Seat

Knoxville lawyer Terry Adams, a Democratic candidate for U.S Senate.
Credit Terry Adams

A Knoxville attorney has become the latest person to enter the race to unseat incumbent Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander in next year's election.

Democrat Terry Adams has announced his bid to run for the seat. He joins a field already occupied by Democrats Larry Crim and Jacob Maurer. Republicans Brenda Lenard, Joe Carr and Danny Page have announced their intention to challenge Sen. Alexander in next spring's GOP primary.

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Science and Society
6:00 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

The Method: Spirits and Graves

On this edition of The Method, we examine how two researchers are putting technology to work to find and identify mass graves. Then, Christine Jessel goes in search of spirits -- the potable kind. The science behind moonshine is her story, so prepare to be jarred.

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Law
6:00 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Knox Criminal Court Clerk to Appear At Meeting On Judicial Errors

Credit http://media.knoxnews.com/media/img/photos/2010/09/01/swear11_mp_web_t607.jpg

Knox County Criminal Court Clerk Joy McCroskey says she will be at a planned meeting in which county political and law enforcement officials will try to get answers on a series of alleged mistakes in McCroskey's office. The meeting is scheduled for Monday, October 28.

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Law
6:00 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Federal Suits Ask for Recognition of Same-Sex Marriages

Dr. Sophy Jesty, left, and Dr. Valeria Tanco of Knoxville speak outside the Davidson County courthouse in Nashville on October, 21, 2013. The two are plaintiffs in a lawsuit over Tennessee's ban on same-sex marriage.
Credit Shelley Mays, Nashville Tennessean

Four gay couples filed lawsuits in federal district court in Nashville on Monday, seeking to compel the state to recognize their marriages.

All four couples, including one from Knoxville, were married in states that offer same-sex marriage, then moved to Tennessee. Attorneys representing the couples say the state's constitutional ban of same-sex marriage denies their clients some basic legal protections straight couples in Tennessee already possess.

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