Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

Ways to Connect

Moxley Carmichael Public Relations

The Associated Press reports two employees of the Pilot Flying J truck stop chain have pleaded guilty in a federal probe of the company’s business practices.

Northeastern sales director Arnold Ralenkotter pleaded guilty Wednesday to one count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud in U.S. District Court in Knoxville. Regional accounts representative Ashley Smith Judd also pleaded guilty to conspiracy.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

In downtown Knoxville, the historic Henley Street Bridge will not re-open next month, as state transportation officials had hoped. The project has been plagued not just by construction delays, but by concerns over worker safety. WUOT’s Brandon Hollingsworth reports.

City of Knoxville

An eight-person panel whose members have connections to Knoxville's arts, educational and business communities will examine potential changes to the city's World's Fair Park. Deputy to the Mayor Bill Lyons and UT professor Jan Simek will co-chair the exploratory committee that will look at options for the park that hosted the 1982 World’s Fair. The Knoxville News Sentinel reports one of those options is a new home for the Clarence Brown Theatre. The UT-based theater is in need of plumbing upgrades and more classroom space.

Before the TV shows, before the blockbuster comedy albums, before he ever told a single joke on stage, Bob Newhart was an accountant in suburban Chicago. It was there that he invented the signature stammering, deadpan delivery that would propel him along a fifty-year odyssey through comedy and our changing times. Newhart recently spoke with WUOT's All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth about the elements of comedy, what he's up to now and why he'll never retire from the stand-up circuit.
 

tva.com

Saturday May 18th marks an important anniversary in the history of the Tennessee River Valley.  It was on that date in 1933 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the bill that created the Tennessee Valley Authority.  Throughout those 80 years, the agency has been the focus of both glowing praise and fervent criticism, all while fighting for its existence in the halls of Congress. To mark the occasion of the 80th anniversary, WUOT’s Brandon Hollingsworth sat down with Pat Ezzell, the TVA's resident historian.

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