Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

Ways to Connect

Knoxville Symphony Orchestra

What does an orchestra sound like? Well, it sounds pretty much like you'd think an orchestra would: Brass, woodwinds, strings and percussion playing classical music. But Aram Demirjian says it should also sound like its hometown.

"The most successful orchestras in the country [are the ones] embracing the character of the cities in which they reside," Demirjian told WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth. "And I hope that's what the Knoxville Symphony will be able to do."

It’s an election year for the ages. Political animosity divides the government and pits former allies against one another. A fierce battle develops over the nation’s economic future. And tensions over the balance between state and federal power nearly tips into armed conflict.

The year is not 2016, but 1832. Andrew Jackson was the man in the White House, and it was a volatile year of his presidency. The University of Tennessee’s Jackson Papers Project has just released a volume of documents, many from Jackson's own hand, covering 1832.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

If you’ve used the free, official highway map of Tennessee, you have Bob Boutiette to thank. From his tenth-floor office at the Tennessee Department of Transportation in Nashville, Boutiette helps edit and update the state map issued each year. And it starts with Post-It notes.

“It just so happens that...over on my desk, I have a 2015 state map with sticky notes on it," Boutiette says. "Because that’s the best way to really keep track of [changes and errors].”

Matt Shafer Powell, WUOT News

Unmanned space probes and rovers are impressive feats of engineering, and they take great photos, but there’s something missing. The last time humans brought back a piece of the place they visited was during the Apollo program, nearly 45 years ago. Now, NASA is ready to embark on a mission that will swoop down close to the surface of an asteroid called Bennu. A long arm of the spacecraft will scoop up soil and rocks, and fly back to Earth.

  Photographer and writer Reed Massengill is knee-deep in the research for a new book about film director Clarence Brown. One of Brown’s silent films, Smouldering Fires, will be shown on Saturday, August 20, as part of the East Tennessee History Fair.

Massengill’s path to the pioneering filmmaker’s story began twenty years ago, when he was writing a book about Byron de la Beckwith, the Mississippi man that murdered civil rights leader Medgar Evers.

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