Brandon Hollingsworth

News Director

Brandon is WUOT’s news director. In that role, he oversees the station's daily news operations. He also hosts Dialogue and produces the biweekly series HealthConnections. For seven years, Brandon was WUOT's All Things Considered anchor. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and Morning Edition anchor at WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

Ways to Connect

WUOT News, Matt Shafer Powell

Early voting for five open seats on the Knoxville City Council ended on Thursday, August 24.  Election Day is Tuesday, August 29.

Thirty candidates are vying for ten slots on November's general election ballot. Here are some basic resources to help you learn more about the candidates and the election.

INTERVIEWS

WBIR's John Becker recorded video interviews with many of the primary's candidates.

Last week, Republican lawmakers who had hoped to repeal, in whole or in part, the Affordable Care Act were dealt a setback. None of the four options debated in the U.S. Senate were approved. That means the ACA remains the law of the land.

University of Tennessee nursing professor Carole Myers says now is the time to modify the ACA. The law has provided health coverage to millions, Myers says, but there's definitely room for improvement.

Regardless of political persuasion, age, gender or other factors, one thing Americans seem to readily agree on is that medical care is too darn expensive. What explains the high cost of health care in this country, versus other industrialized nations?

On this edition of HealthConnections, University of Tennessee College of Nursing assistant professor Carole Myers explains three major elements that inflate medical costs in the U.S.: misapplication of supply and demand; an over-reliance on expensive, unnecessary tests; and a fragmented health insurance system.

ZaldyImg/via Flickr Creative Commons

For the first time in Tennessee history, local-level nonprofits will be able to establish and maintain syringe exchange programs. The programs are politically controversial, but medical experts generally agree they reduce disease transmission and may offer a path for addicts to enter recovery.

National Park Service

Appalachia is the place to be these days, at least for reporters and columnists searching for…well, what exactly? The roots of Donald Trump’s appeal? The plight of former coal towns? Explanations for the rise of the alt-right?

Yeah, all of the above, and more. Our guest on the July edition of Dialogue says Appalachia is often used as a canvas, allowing commentators to paint whatever picture they like. And, she says, the resulting image is usually way off the mark.

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