Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

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All earthquakes are products of the dynamic planet we live on. They typically occur as massive slabs of the Earth's crust, called tectonic plates, bump against, over and past each other.

Education, highway paving, payroll expenses. Most of the money allocated in Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett's proposed FY 2017 budget is directed toward the necessities of county government and services.

"This budget isn't sexy," Burchett said in a morning budget announcement, "But that's the way it should be."

National Weather Service Morristown

Five years ago today, April 27, 2011, Tennessee and four other Southern states were ground zero for the largest tornado outbreak in American history. The Super Outbreak of 2011 produced a record number of tornadoes on a single day. In East Tennessee, 53 tornadoes killed 32 people and injured more than 300 others.

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In 2013, USA Today estimated 83 percent of Americans have at least one cup of coffee a day. Some drink way more than that. But even lifelong coffee drinkers can learn how to make a better cup through science.

In this edition of The Method, Brandon Hollingsworth talks with Knoxville coffee shop owner Pierce LaMacchia about the science behind the brewing process. Then, a researcher at Vanderbilt University's Institute for Coffee Studies tells Matt Shafer Powell about the biological effects of coffee.

History is full of ironies. The U.S. Treasury launched a big one in 1928, when it selected Andrew Jackson to be the face of the twenty-dollar bill. How's that ironic? Andrew Jackson considered only precious metals such as gold and silver to have monetary value. He distrusted paper money and spent much of his presidency working to defeat a national banking system. Not exactly the poster boy for a bill that makes up 25 percent of the paper money printed in the United States this year.

WBMA Birmingham/ABC 33-40

If you grew up in the South, you grew up with tornadoes and tornado warnings. But you probably didn’t know there are some big differences between the tornadoes that happen here, and their Midwestern cousins. They’re typically deadlier. They’re harder to see. And they’re more likely to happen at night, an especially dangerous time.

Benjamin Benschneider

In her time, the ocean liner Lusitania was the finest ship to ply the Atlantic passenger route between New York and England. Her opulence and speed were well-known, and passage on the ship was considered near the height of luxury.

In eight years, Lusitania made 201 trips across the pond, sometimes setting new speed records for the transatlantic crossing. But her final voyage – number 202 – ended in tragedy, confusion and mysteries that linger to this day.

Jonathan Walton/Harvard University

About 40 years ago, Christian preachers in the U.S. started singing a seldom-heard hymn: God rewards the wealthy. It’s called the prosperity gospel, and though its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth century, it was the rise of televangelism in the 1970s and '80s that lofted prosperity theology to a wide audience.

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Tennessee voters will head to the polls on primary day, Tuesday, March 1. Gone are the paper ballots of decades past – the process is virtually all electronic now. So what happens once you press the button that records your ballot? Where does the information go? To find out, Matt Shafer Powell spoke with Chris Davis of the Knox County Election Commission.

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