Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

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Tennessee voters will head to the polls on primary day, Tuesday, March 1. Gone are the paper ballots of decades past – the process is virtually all electronic now. So what happens once you press the button that records your ballot? Where does the information go? To find out, Matt Shafer Powell spoke with Chris Davis of the Knox County Election Commission.

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Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Three years ago, an edition of Dialogue focused on the Affordable Care Act and its effects in Tennessee. Much of what the panel discussed that day in 2013 was speculative, because many of the ACA’s provisions hadn’t taken effect.

Now, consumers, doctors, hospitals and insurers are dealing with the effects – both good and bad – of the controversial law known as “Obamacare.” In this edition of Dialogue, we re-visit the ACA, health insurance and more.

Library of Congress

Nearly a century ago, when medical science was in its relative Bronze Age, a severe strain of influenza spread around the world. The flu of 1918 killed between 50 and 100 million people. Today, many people think of the flu as a routine illness. But the flu strains of today are the genetic descendants of the 1918 flu. Dr.

OKRoads.com

John Baker knows a thing or two about how dangerous it can be to drive on Alcoa Highway. He lives just off the four-lane road in south Knoxville.

“Depending on the time of day, it’s sometimes a kind of scary thing to pull out onto Alcoa Highway,” he says. “It is definitely sort of a hold-your-breath-and-punch-it kind of deal.”

Baker’s car is one of the estimated 47,000 vehicles Alcoa Highway handles every day. State transportation officials say they want to make the route connecting Knoxville and Maryville safer. They also say it will cost a lot of money.

wn.com

Just before lunchtime Monday, Knox County School Superintendent Jim McIntyre announced his resignation, which will take effect in July.

The decorations have been put away. The nights are long, and spring seems like a long way away. Now is a great time to chase away the winter blues with some good science books!

No, not those dense science textbooks from your school days. Books that bring the stories of science to life. As we close out 2015, Method host Brandon Hollingsworth and two previous guests suggest some great additions to your winter reading list.

Liz Aaron

"I wear green velvet knickers, a forest green velvet smock and a perky little hat decorated with spangles. This is my work uniform."

That’s how humorist David Sedaris' opens his dyspeptic take on the most wonderful time of the year. His essay, The Santaland Diaries, is a jaundiced but hilarious view of Christmas, as told by a Macy’s department store elf named…Crumpet.

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The most recent edition of the Pew Center’s Religious Landscape Survey confirms what other polls have shown in recent years: Americans are increasingly likely to answer “none,” when asked about their religious affiliation. And while Tennessee and the South are more religious than other parts of the nation, fewer people are hanging on to the tenets of that old time religion.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

It's a very special Thanksgiving edition of WUOT's signature science series. First up, your Thanksgiving meal might include a stout ale or a nice IPA. But before you take a sip, think about the shape of your beer glass, and the temperature of the beverage. Glassmaker Matthew Cummings has studied both, and he says the way you drink your favorite brew might be hurting, instead of helping, the experience. Cummings talks with Method host Brandon Hollingsworth.

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