Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

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Politics
6:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

State Rep. Lois DeBerry Dies

State Representative Lois DeBerry.
Credit Tennessee General Assembly

In her 41 years in the Tennessee House, Representative Lois DeBerry fought many battles. But it was a battle waged within her own body that proved to be the toughest. DeBerry lost her fight with pancreatic cancer on Sunday. She was 68.

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Science and Society
6:00 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

The Method: Primitive Art and AIDS in Appalachia

A scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding (in green) from a cultured lymphocyte
Credit wikimedia commons

This month on The Method, we examine two interesting fields of research - one rooted in the distant past; the other looking to the near future. Chrissy Keuper interviews Dr. Jan Simek about how archaeologists study some of the oldest cave art in North America. In the second portion of the program, Brandon Hollingsworth talks to researcher Joanne Hall about a first-of-a-kind study on end-of-life care for AIDS patients in Appalachia.

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Economy
6:00 am
Fri July 26, 2013

County Jobless Rates Climb in June

County unemployment rates for the month of June have been released, and the numbers in many counties are not what you might expect from an economic recovery.

Jobless rates increased in 91 of Tennessee’s 95 counties last month, according to the figures from the state Department of Labor and Workforce Development. There are a couple of major factors that explain the trend. Economists say that as the job market improves, more unemployed Tennesseans jump back into searching for work. The more people are out looking for work, the higher the measured unemployment rate.

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Dialogue
2:38 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Dialogue: Fracking in Tennessee

Credit popularmechanics.com

The natural gas drilling method known as fracking is igniting controversy in states from Pennsylvania to Wyoming. Fracking is going on in Tennessee, too, and that has environmentalists concerned. This hour of Dialogue is dedicated to learning about the pros and cons of fracking in Tennessee. In the first portion of Dialogue, we hear from Dr. Kevin Hoyt of the University of Tennessee. He's heading up the university's efforts to study fracking on the Cumberland Plateau.

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Government
6:24 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Knox County Selects New Trustee

Knox County Trustee Craig Leuthold.
Credit Knoxville News Sentinel

Craig Leuthold will be Knox County’s next trustee. On Monday afternoon, the Knox County Commission selected Leuthold from a pool of 25 applicants for the job of county banker. That job was vacated by John Duncan III earlier this month after it was revealed Duncan and other trustee’s office employees accepted approximately $18,000 in bonuses for training they did not complete.

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Politics
6:00 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Loudon County Commission Plans Budget Vote, Despite Open Questions

Loudon County Courthouse, in Loudon, Tennessee.
Credit Scott Basford

The Loudon County Commission is expected to vote Monday on a proposed budget for the upcoming year, despite open questions about the spending plan.

The overall county budget is pegged $70 million. The debate centers around less than a million of that. $916,000 was moved from reserve funds to shore up the $36 million school system budget. Loudon County commissioner Don Miller tells the Knoxville News Sentinel he isn’t sure the money transfer was legal. State law says such transfers can be spent on "any education purpose," according to the News Sentinel.

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Education
5:12 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Knox School Board Considers Magnet School Proposal

Pellissippi State Community College's Strawberry Plains campus in eastern Knox County.
Credit Pellissippi State Community College

The Knox County School Board meets Monday night to discuss a proposed career and technical education magnet school in the eastern part of the county. School leaders plan to open the facility in the fall of 2014 in a special wing of Pellissippi State Community College’s campus in Strawberry Plains.

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Politics
5:44 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Sen. Campfield Asks For TBI Investigation Into Phone Poll

State Senator Stacey Campfield (R-Knoxville).
Credit Tennessee General Assembly

State Senator Stacey Campfield (R-Knoxville) is asking the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to look into a poll that solicited voters' opinions of the lawmaker. Campfield says the poll, conducted last month, may have violated anti-harassment laws.

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Science and Society
6:00 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

The Method: Bees and Batteries

Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientist Jianlin Li shows a typical lithium-ion battery. Such batteries power smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices.
Credit Christine Jessel, WUOT News

This go 'round on WUOT's The Method, Christine Jessel talks to researchers who are trying to give batteries a boost. That could mean cheaper goods and more power in your electronic devices. Then, Brandon Hollingsworth sits down with University of Tennessee entomologist John Skinner to find out what could explain the mysterious disappearance of bees in North America and Europe.

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State Government
6:00 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Ruling Clears Way For State Layoffs

Tennessee State Employees Association Executive Director Robert O'Connell

Close to 200 state employees are facing the end of their jobs after a circuit court judge ruled the Haslam administration did not violate state law in ordering layoffs. The ruling is a blow to the workers who were fighting the decision in court.

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