Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

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Science
5:50 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

East Tennessee Geologist Marks Curiosity's First Year on Mars

Geologist Linda Kah analyzes layered sedimentary rocks on Mars, not unlike those pictured here in Utah.

  

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Economics
6:12 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

State's Sales Tax Holiday Not a Boom for Retailers

Credit Courtesy noise64, Flickr via Creative Commons

There's little doubt shoppers are looking forward to Tennessee's annual sales tax holiday this weekend, but a prominent state economist says the economic benefit is minimal.

"[Consumers] are buying what they would have bought anyway," said Bill Fox, director of the Tennessee Center for Business and Economic Research. "They’re just changing when they make the purchase. And that doesn’t have much of an economic impact.”

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Politics
5:50 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Tennessee GOP Sets Sights on Local Offices

Brent Leatherwood, Executive Director of the Tennessee GOP.
Credit Tennessee GOP

Since the end of the Civil War, Tennessee Republicans have rarely enjoyed a string of victories. But that’s changing. Republicans occupy both U.S. Senate seats, seven of the nine U.S. House seats, the governor’s mansion and – for the first time in more than a century – a supermajority in the General Assembly. But the party isn’t coasting on its success. The Tennessee GOP is setting its sights on winning more seats, at the county and city level. The effort is called Red to the Roots, and it could be coming to a town near you.

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Law
6:00 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Mufreesboro Mosque Opponents Hope To Take Fight To State Supreme Court

The Islamic Center of Murfreesboro.
Credit Saleh Sbenaty, ICM

Opponents of a Murfreesboro mosque are headed back to court, this time with the hopes the Tennessee Supreme Court will hear their argument.

The Islamic Center of Murfreesboro has been complete and open to worshipers for nearly a year, but that hasn’t stopped local opponents from continuing an appeal against its construction. Plaintiffs claim Rutherford County failed to give adequate public notice before approving the mosque's construction in May of 2010.

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Politics
6:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

State Rep. Lois DeBerry Dies

State Representative Lois DeBerry.
Credit Tennessee General Assembly

In her 41 years in the Tennessee House, Representative Lois DeBerry fought many battles. But it was a battle waged within her own body that proved to be the toughest. DeBerry lost her fight with pancreatic cancer on Sunday. She was 68.

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Science and Society
6:00 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

The Method: Primitive Art and AIDS in Appalachia

A scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding (in green) from a cultured lymphocyte
Credit wikimedia commons

This month on The Method, we examine two interesting fields of research - one rooted in the distant past; the other looking to the near future. Chrissy Keuper interviews Dr. Jan Simek about how archaeologists study some of the oldest cave art in North America. In the second portion of the program, Brandon Hollingsworth talks to researcher Joanne Hall about a first-of-a-kind study on end-of-life care for AIDS patients in Appalachia.

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Economy
6:00 am
Fri July 26, 2013

County Jobless Rates Climb in June

County unemployment rates for the month of June have been released, and the numbers in many counties are not what you might expect from an economic recovery.

Jobless rates increased in 91 of Tennessee’s 95 counties last month, according to the figures from the state Department of Labor and Workforce Development. There are a couple of major factors that explain the trend. Economists say that as the job market improves, more unemployed Tennesseans jump back into searching for work. The more people are out looking for work, the higher the measured unemployment rate.

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Dialogue
2:38 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Dialogue: Fracking in Tennessee

Credit popularmechanics.com

The natural gas drilling method known as fracking is igniting controversy in states from Pennsylvania to Wyoming. Fracking is going on in Tennessee, too, and that has environmentalists concerned. This hour of Dialogue is dedicated to learning about the pros and cons of fracking in Tennessee. In the first portion of Dialogue, we hear from Dr. Kevin Hoyt of the University of Tennessee. He's heading up the university's efforts to study fracking on the Cumberland Plateau.

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Government
6:24 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Knox County Selects New Trustee

Knox County Trustee Craig Leuthold.
Credit Knoxville News Sentinel

Craig Leuthold will be Knox County’s next trustee. On Monday afternoon, the Knox County Commission selected Leuthold from a pool of 25 applicants for the job of county banker. That job was vacated by John Duncan III earlier this month after it was revealed Duncan and other trustee’s office employees accepted approximately $18,000 in bonuses for training they did not complete.

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Politics
6:00 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Loudon County Commission Plans Budget Vote, Despite Open Questions

Loudon County Courthouse, in Loudon, Tennessee.
Credit Scott Basford

The Loudon County Commission is expected to vote Monday on a proposed budget for the upcoming year, despite open questions about the spending plan.

The overall county budget is pegged $70 million. The debate centers around less than a million of that. $916,000 was moved from reserve funds to shore up the $36 million school system budget. Loudon County commissioner Don Miller tells the Knoxville News Sentinel he isn’t sure the money transfer was legal. State law says such transfers can be spent on "any education purpose," according to the News Sentinel.

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