Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

Ways To Connect

Nissa Dahiln-Brown, Howard Baker Center for Public Policy

How dangerous is Deborah Jones' job? So dangerous that she has been working out of another country for nearly a year.

The U.S. Ambassador to Libya is based in Malta, mainly over safety concerns. From there and many other locations around the Mediterranean, Jones works to bring together the various factions fighting for resources and political control in Libya.

Dave Boucher/Tennessean

Tennessee's state Republican Party has a new leader. Former state Representative Ryan Haynes says a big part of his job as chairman will be making sure Republicans don't lose the political ground they've gained in the state over the last few election cycles.

Haynes recently spoke with WUOT All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth. He talked about how he thinks young voters perceive the party, what to do about intra-party divisions and his plans to lead state Republicans into the future.

On Friday, April 10, thousands of gun enthusiasts and second amendment advocates will descend on Nashville for the National Rifle Association's 2015 convention. They'll be joined by several Republican heavyweights, including Jeb Bush, Ted Cruz and Scott Walker.

One prominent figure won't be there: Governor Bill Haslam. He wasn't invited.

Scientific American

National Public Radio science correspondent Joe Palca was in Knoxville this week, explaining the universe in just two minutes. He also found a few minutes to come by our studios to speak with WUOT's Chrissy Keuper.

Tennessee Coalition for Open Government

March 15 - 21 is Sunshine Week, an annual event that commemorates the public's right to keep tabs on local, state and federal government. By coincidence, it was also a week in which secret House meetings were reported in the media. Tennessee House Speaker Beth Harwell asked that those meetings now be opened to the press and the public.

TN Learn/Mathline

Math teacher Ernie Roberts has a busy definition of retirement. He still teaches at Bearden High in Knox County. And every weeknight, he drives to the studios of East Tennessee PBS to teach to an even bigger classroom – a television audience.

Roberts' program, called Mathline, is designed to help students. But Roberts discovered curiosity about math is shared by people of all ages.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Cassius Cash’s arrival as superintendent of Great Smoky Mountains National Park is something of a homecoming. A Memphis native, Cash’s path took him from owl habitats in Washington state to managing historical sites in Boston. But now, as the National Park Service official in charge of the system’s busiest park, he faces unique challenges and benefits that happen only in the Smokies.

Bryan Allen

Whether you’re a native Tennessean or a newcomer, the state’s natural diversity and wild landscapes are among the most visible trademarks of the Volunteer State. But maybe you’ve never explored those places, even in your own neighborhood.

McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture

Today, a map is something you look at on a tiny smartphone screen, showing where you are and what's within fifty feet. But for most of cartography's history, maps took a broader view, showing not only political and geographic boundaries, but culture and art. Cartography is a melding of science and art, as Matt Shafer Powell learned while looking through the McClung Museum's newest acquisitions.

Liz Aaron

The place is South Africa, during the time of apartheid. A young white man, referred to as Master Harold, has a tense relationship with his black servants, Sam and Willie. The play is called Master Harold...and the Boys, and it’s rooted in the real life experiences of playwright Athol Fugard.

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