Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

Pages

Arts and Culture
12:00 pm
Wed February 4, 2015

"Master Harold" Examines Race Through The Lens Of Apartheid

Bryant Bentley (left), Rico Bruce Wade and Eric Sorrels star in the Clarence Brown Theatre production of Athol Fugard's "Master Harold...and the Boys."
Credit Liz Aaron

The place is South Africa, during the time of apartheid. A young white man, referred to as Master Harold, has a tense relationship with his black servants, Sam and Willie. The play is called Master Harold...and the Boys, and it’s rooted in the real life experiences of playwright Athol Fugard.

Read more
Politics
11:22 am
Mon February 2, 2015

The Political Battle For Insure Tennessee

Governor Bill Haslam and TennCare director Darin Gordon.

On Monday, February 2, the Tennessee General Assembly began a special session to take up the matter of Insure Tennessee.

WUOT’s Brandon Hollingsworth reports this session could be the make-or-break moment for Governor Bill Haslam’s long-debated compromise measure to provide health coverage to uninsured Tennesseans.

Read more
Science and Society
5:50 pm
Fri January 30, 2015

The Method: A Focus On Children's Health

Winter's gloomy days and long nights can contribute to seasonal affective disorder in children as well as adults.
Credit National Park Service

The edition of The Method focuses on issues surrounding children’s health.

Seasonal Affective Disorder is a temporary depression that often shows up in the winter. You may think of it as a problem only for adults. But the American Academy of Pediatrics estimates three percent of children between the ages of 9 and 17 suffer from it. Child and adolescent psychiatrist John Kupfner of Peninsula Lighthouse in East Tennessee says  he believes the condition is under-diagnosed in children.

Read more
Science and Technology
5:45 am
Wed January 21, 2015

ORNL Director Optimistic About Lab's Present And Future

Credit nationalengineeringforum.com

Tuesday night, President Obama outlined his budget priorities for the coming year in the State of the Union address. Oak Ridge National Laboratory director Thom Mason will be watching that budget process closely, because it will determine how the laboratory carries out its major research.

Read more
Education Policy
3:00 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Presidential Plan For Community College Education Has Tennessee Roots

President Barack Obama announces a plan for free community college nationwide. The president spoke at Pellissippi State Community College, Friday, January 9, 2014.
Credit Brandon Hollingsworth/WUOT News

In a speech at Pellissippi State Community College, President Barack Obama outlined plans to make community college tuition-free for certain students. Sound familiar? It should.

The president’s proposal is based in part on Tennessee Promise, Governor Bill Haslam’s plan to put college and technical education within reach of many Tennesseans.

Read more
Education
5:50 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

UT President Joe DiPietro Looks To Shore Up University Business Model

The funding model that keeps the University of Tennessee in business is unsustainable. That was the message delivered to state officials last month from UT system president Joe DiPietro.

Now in the fifth year of his presidency, DiPietro says one of his biggest challenges will be finding a way to keep the university affordable for students and functioning as state funding stagnates. DiPietro isn't optimistic the General Assembly will significantly increase funding for the state's higher education institutions.

Read more
Science and Society
5:50 pm
Fri December 26, 2014

The Method: Our 36th Annual Holiday Special

The Skylab 4 astronauts decorated their abode in space with a Christmas tree fashioned out of food cans. Christmas 1973 fell near the middle of their 84-day mission.
Credit NASA

And just like that, another year is in the books. 2014 marked The Method's first full year on the air, and twelve times, Brandon, Chrissy and Matt brought you stories of the ways science affects our lives. In this special look back on the year that was, Brandon and Chrissy share some of their favorite stories from 2014.

Read more
Politics
5:50 pm
Mon December 15, 2014

Haslam Formally Announces Compromise Health Coverage Proposal

Gov. Bill Haslam announces his Insure Tennessee proposal for health coverage on Monday, December 15, 2014.
Credit Brandon Hollingsworth/WUOT News

On Monday, Governor Bill Haslam formally announced his long-awaited compromise plan to provide health coverage to uninsured Tennesseans. It’s called Insure Tennessee, and though it’s been a year-and-a-half in the making, it’s not a done deal yet.

Bobby Allyn, a reporter with WPLN, Nashville Public Radio, joined WUOT All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth to talk about Insure Tennessee and how it will work.

Read more
Arts and Culture
5:50 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

For John McCutcheon, Music Starts With A Story

In rare circumstances, a person can point to a single moment in which their eyes were opened to an event that changed his life. For John McCutcheon, the moment was in his family's living room on a hot afternoon in August 1963. He was eleven.

Read more
Arts and Culture
1:50 pm
Wed December 10, 2014

Old Crow Medicine Show's Ketch Secor On Life, Landscapes And Music

Ketch Secor, of Old Crow Medicine Show.
Credit Rick Diamond/Getty Images

It’s often been said that the three things America will be known for, once all is said and done, are jazz, baseball and the Constitution.

"I love baseball, and I love jazz, and I believe in the Constitution," Old Crow Medicine Show frontman Ketch Secor says. But, he adds, two things might outlast them all: The fiddle and the banjo.

The moment those two instruments met, he says, was "the Big Bang not of country music, but of all American popular music."

Read more

Pages