Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

Ways to Connect

OKRoads.com

John Baker knows a thing or two about how dangerous it can be to drive on Alcoa Highway. He lives just off the four-lane road in south Knoxville.

“Depending on the time of day, it’s sometimes a kind of scary thing to pull out onto Alcoa Highway,” he says. “It is definitely sort of a hold-your-breath-and-punch-it kind of deal.”

Baker’s car is one of the estimated 47,000 vehicles Alcoa Highway handles every day. State transportation officials say they want to make the route connecting Knoxville and Maryville safer. They also say it will cost a lot of money.

wn.com

Just before lunchtime Monday, Knox County School Superintendent Jim McIntyre announced his resignation, which will take effect in July.

The decorations have been put away. The nights are long, and spring seems like a long way away. Now is a great time to chase away the winter blues with some good science books!

No, not those dense science textbooks from your school days. Books that bring the stories of science to life. As we close out 2015, Method host Brandon Hollingsworth and two previous guests suggest some great additions to your winter reading list.

Liz Aaron

"I wear green velvet knickers, a forest green velvet smock and a perky little hat decorated with spangles. This is my work uniform."

That’s how humorist David Sedaris' opens his dyspeptic take on the most wonderful time of the year. His essay, The Santaland Diaries, is a jaundiced but hilarious view of Christmas, as told by a Macy’s department store elf named…Crumpet.

via Flickr/TumblingRun

The most recent edition of the Pew Center’s Religious Landscape Survey confirms what other polls have shown in recent years: Americans are increasingly likely to answer “none,” when asked about their religious affiliation. And while Tennessee and the South are more religious than other parts of the nation, fewer people are hanging on to the tenets of that old time religion.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

It's a very special Thanksgiving edition of WUOT's signature science series. First up, your Thanksgiving meal might include a stout ale or a nice IPA. But before you take a sip, think about the shape of your beer glass, and the temperature of the beverage. Glassmaker Matthew Cummings has studied both, and he says the way you drink your favorite brew might be hurting, instead of helping, the experience. Cummings talks with Method host Brandon Hollingsworth.

U.S. Department of Energy

Thursday is a day for celebration in Oak Ridge, as residents mark the creation of the country's newest national park. The secretaries of the Interior and Energy departments signed documents this week formally establishing Manhattan Project National Historical Park.

Manhattan Project NHP is actually three parks, each at or near sites significant to the design and creation of the first atomic bombs. The other sites are located at Hanford, Washington, and Los Alamos, New Mexico.

capitol.tn.gov

A new analysis from the Center for Public Integrity gave Tennessee a D for its government integrity. The grade reflects the Center's findings after examining thirteen broad areas of government, from judicial accountability to public records access. Some of the issues identified as problems were loopholes in campaign finance laws, an ineffective state ethics commission, and a lack of legislative transparency.

Albert C. Goodyear

Archaeology is by definition the story of the past. But what we learn from it is quite often new and unexpected. Case in point: archaeological studies of Native American communities in the South that predate European exploration, or even the invention of written language. Anthropologist David Anderson will talk about what’s new in Southern archaeology at the University of Tennessee’s Pregame Showcase on November 7.

Matt Shafer Powell, WUOT News

At Maryville College, two of the picnic tables outside the student dining hall might look a little odd to you. It's because they've been outfitted with umbrella-like shades that contain solar panels.

The energy the panels produce goes into charging stations built into the picnic shelters, so students have the opportunity to soak up the sun while their devices charge. But students have been getting way more out of the picnic tables than a fully-charged smartphone.

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