Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

Ways to Connect

To say the least, it's been an interesting campaign season, resulting in an election night for the ages.  Even here in East Tennessee, one of the state's most closely-watched races has yet to be resolved.  As of midnight, Republican incumbent Eddie Smith led Democratic challenger Gloria Johnson by a mere 154 votes in the race for the 13th Tennessee House seat.  That race may not be resolved until all provisional ballots have been counted.  

Here are the winners from  some of Tuesday's Tennessee races:

This week, WUOT News is giving you a preview of the 2016 elections in Tennessee. Today, the Anderson County charter commission. Voters will choose eight people who will write the county’s first charter document. Anderson will be only the third county in the state to adopt a charter form of government, after Knox and Shelby. Joe Jarret knows about this topic, because he advised Knox County's charter review panel in 2012. Jarret speaks with WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth.

Brandon Hollingsworth/WUOT News

Imagine being in the hospital, but unable to tell your doctor what’s wrong. WUOT’s Megan Jamerson visits Rebecca Kosalinski, a University of Tennessee nursing professor who helped invent Speak for Myself, an app that helps patients give doctors, nurses and caregivers important information.

Brandon Hollingsworth/data from Brian Fuchs, National Drought Mitigation Center

East Tennessee is dry. Dangerously so. The latest edition of the Palmer Drought Index shows every county in the region is running short on rainfall, from “unusually dry” at the Kentucky border to “moderate drought” for Knoxville and Maryville, to “exceptional drought” for Chattanooga and Hamilton County.

The drought means less water flowing into streams and rivers. The conditions threaten crops and livestock. And wildfires are much more likely to occur and spread rapidly.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

Many of us take the internet for granted, and may even think of it as a luxury, something to waste time at work or share cat videos. But for some people, no high-speed internet access could close the door to economic and personal growth, from job applications to online college courses. Today on Dialogue, we explore broadband access in Tennessee and what it means for residents, communities and the state.

UK Department of Transportation

More than fifty years ago, The Jetsons predicted life in the 21st century would be defined by homes in the sky and flying cars. History, of course, took a different path. Today's prognosticators say the highways of the future will be filled with automated, driverless vehicles. Nineteen companies say they're working to get models to the market around 2020.

Mark Davis, Getty Images

The saying goes, the camera doesn't lie. But cameras don't snap images on their own. They're operated by people, and those people bring their own feelings, backgrounds, philosophies and biases to the process of documenting life. The result, says Thomas Allen Harris, tells us about the photographer, the subject and ultimately, the viewer.

"I tell my students, you could show 50 people the same photograph, and they could come up with 50 different interpretations," Harris says.

Knoxville Symphony Orchestra

What does an orchestra sound like? Well, it sounds pretty much like you'd think an orchestra would: Brass, woodwinds, strings and percussion playing classical music. But Aram Demirjian says it should also sound like its hometown.

"The most successful orchestras in the country [are the ones] embracing the character of the cities in which they reside," Demirjian told WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth. "And I hope that's what the Knoxville Symphony will be able to do."

It’s an election year for the ages. Political animosity divides the government and pits former allies against one another. A fierce battle develops over the nation’s economic future. And tensions over the balance between state and federal power nearly tips into armed conflict.

The year is not 2016, but 1832. Andrew Jackson was the man in the White House, and it was a volatile year of his presidency. The University of Tennessee’s Jackson Papers Project has just released a volume of documents, many from Jackson's own hand, covering 1832.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

If you’ve used the free, official highway map of Tennessee, you have Bob Boutiette to thank. From his tenth-floor office at the Tennessee Department of Transportation in Nashville, Boutiette helps edit and update the state map issued each year. And it starts with Post-It notes.

“It just so happens that...over on my desk, I have a 2015 state map with sticky notes on it," Boutiette says. "Because that’s the best way to really keep track of [changes and errors].”

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