Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

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Early voting for five seats on the Knoxville City Council is underway. Election Day is Tuesday, November 7. The August primary narrowed the field from 30 candidates to ten - sort of. A second-place tie in the Fourth District forced the incumbent city council to make a choice. This they did, sending Harry Tindell on to the general election slate. Amelia Parker decided to stay in the race as a write-in option.

For decades, where Catholics went to mass was a matter of geography. But increasingly, the Church is making room for personal preferences, including ethnicity, social values or even the style of service. It's called the "personal parish," and it's the subject of Maryville College sociologist Tricia Bruce's new book, Parish and Place: Making Room for Diversity in the American Catholic Church.

Polk County is the very southeast corner of Tennessee. Its population is just shy of 17,000. It’s known for its whitewater rafting and was once the epicenter of Tennessee’s copper industry. And, at this moment, it has no hospital. The Copper Basin Medical Center closed this month, not only leaving Polk Countians without immediate medical care, but becoming the tenth rural hospital in the state to close since 2010. Today, we look at the challenges rural hospitals face.

Circle September 30 on your calendar. That's the end of the current federal fiscal year. With it may come significant changes for a children's insurance program, less money for community health centers, and a possible repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

There's a lot to look out for this week as the Friday deadline draws near. In this edition of HealthConnections, UT's Dr. Carole Myers talks with WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth about the significance of September 30.

In testimony last week before the U.S. Senate's Health, Education Labor and Pensions (HELP) committee, Tennessee Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak and Governor Bill Haslam urged Congress to keep paying cost-sharing payments called CSRs. The Trump Administration has hinted it will halt those payments, a move observers have said could be dangerous for already-precarious markets, consumers and insurers.

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