Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

Ways To Connect

Pellissippi State Community College

This fall, thousands of Tennessee college freshmen entered the classroom with the help of state scholarship money. The program, called Tennessee Promise, is designed to boost college graduation rates. WUOT’s Brandon Hollingsworth reports one of its main tools is money to combat spiraling tuition costs.

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It’s the first week of classes at Pellissippi State Community College, in west Knox County. 1,752 of the college’s 2,550 registered freshmen wouldn’t be here without Tennessee Promise. One of them is Gabbie Abbatmarco.

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

 Early this year, virologist Colleen Jonsson moved from Kentucky to Knoxville, to become the new director of NIMBioS. That’s the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, located on the University of Tennessee campus. WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper spoke with Jonsson about the institute and her plans for its future.

Tennessee Valley Authority

 On Friday, August 21, the Tennessee Valley Authority’s board of directors approved a long-term plan for the utility’s future. Called an Integrated Resource Plan, or IRP, its intent is to forecast how TVA will generate power over roughly the next twenty years.

Andrew Jackson died in 1845, but somewhere, his ears must be burning. This week, Tennessee Democratic Party chair Mary Mancini said it was time to have a discussion about removing Jackson’s name from the party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner. And this year, there have been other such conversations, nationwide, about the legacy of the seventh president.

NASA

Back on our April show, University of Tennessee planetary scientist Josh Emery came by to brief us on the big questions about Pluto and its moons ahead of New Horizon's historic flyby. That encounter, the primary goal of the New Horizons mission, happened on July 14. Scientists here on Earth are just getting their first glimpses at the results, and Dr. Emery is back to tell us what they're learning.

http://blogs.longwood.edu/wilmouth400/files/2014/02/budget.jpg

Today is the first day of the 2015 and 16 fiscal year… and we have a snapshot of the budgets for the City of Knoxville and for Knox County.

Mayor Madeline Rogero sat down with WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper to discuss the new $206 million budget for the City of Knoxville, which is heavy on funding for infrastructure, including sidewalks for the city’s neighborhoods…

 

freedomtomarry.org

At 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time this morning, the Supreme Court of the United States declared same-sex marriage bans unconstitutional. Marriage equality advocates hailed the decision as a victory for the nation, while opponents described the ruling as a misapplication of judicial power.

Regardless of your stance on the matter, today's decision was a watershed moment in American history. Part of that history was forged here in East Tennessee. Plaintiffs Val Tanco and Sophy Jesty were one of the couples that challenged Tennessee's same-sex marriage ban.

Kathryn King/Y-12

Sending humans into space is a relatively recent achievement of the species. Yet, the half-century since Yuri Gagarin's historic one-orbit flight has seen manned space flight go from extraordinary to routine, a startling evolution.

In this edition of The Method, we examine what we can learn from the space program, even in its less-glorious years.

Sociologist Lindsey Freeman grew up in Oak Ridge. As she got older, she began to wonder how her city told its own story. She noticed, for instance, that local museums exalted the people and ideas that shaped atomic warfare, but paid little attention to nuclear opposition. Her story of Oak Ridge and its struggle to present its unique history is the subject of a new book, Longing for the Bomb: Oak Ridge and Atomic Nostalgia.

University of Alabama Cartographic Research Library

On June 1, 1796, the federal government of the United States took a narrow strip of territory from the Appalachians to the Mississippi River and called it the State of Tennessee. But most of that land still belonged to American Indians. As late as 1825, maps still labeled the southeastern parts of Tennessee, around what is now Chattanooga and as far north as Athens, as “Cherokee Lands.”

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