Brandon Hollingsworth

All Things Considered Host/Producer

Brandon is WUOT’s All Things Considered host. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and anchored Morning Edition on WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. Regionally, his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia .

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Ala., a fact of which he is intensely proud.

Ways to Connect

The time: Ten years ago this month. The place: The state capitol in Nashville. Senator Randy McNally of Oak Ridge was approached to run for Senate Speaker. He preferred the job go to Ron Ramsey, and it did.

This month, McNally was elected to succeed Ramsey in the job he first considered a decade ago. In this conversation, Speaker McNally talks with WUOT All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth about about the Speaker’s position and how it has changed since 2007.

National Endowment for the Humanities

Writer James Agee died in 1955, but the re-discovery of his work continues today. This month, the University of Tennessee Press will release new collections reflecting on Agee’s work as a critic and journalist. Tuesday evening, Professor Michael Lofaro will lead a discussion about Agee’s nonfiction work as part of UT’s Conversations and Cocktails series.

In in the early 1950s, a girl named June Kent borrowed an encyclopedia volume – the letter A. Reading that volume, she learned about astronomy, aeronautics and a new field called astronautics – sending machines and people into space. Years later, June Kent would marry test pilot Dick Scobee, and the two of them shared an excitement about Dick’s role in the space shuttle program.

U.S. Geological Survey

In September, I invited the University of Tennessee's Dan Feller over to talk about the latest printed edition of The Papers of Andrew Jackson. The hefty volume includes Jackson's letters, other correspondence and handwritten minutiae from the year 1832.

There’s no place like home for the holidays…at least, that's what we're told. But after an exceedingly divisive election season and a result that left many wounds, the thought of politics rearing its head at family gatherings or office Christmas parties may have you reaching for the Tums instead of egg nog. On this edition of Dialogue, we discuss civility and relationships in this unique holiday season. Can our differences be fixed with wrapping paper and bows?

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