Brandon Hollingsworth

News Director

Brandon is WUOT’s news director. In that role, he oversees the station's daily news operations. He also hosts Dialogue and produces the biweekly series HealthConnections. For seven years, Brandon was WUOT's All Things Considered anchor. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and Morning Edition anchor at WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

Ways to Connect

How you feel about Medicaid depends on how you feel about the federal government, welfare, entitlement programs and even your economic philosophy. While the health coverage program sees broad approval among the American public, fault lines begin to appear when specific issues are raised.

Should people on Medicaid be required by law to work? Who should be covered? How large or small should Medicaid be? Conservatives, liberals and independents tend to disagree on these and other questions.

Jeffrey Beall, via Flickr/Creative Commons

Coal and Appalachia have long been considered synonymous. But that isn't the reality of the region. The industry has been shrinking for decades, and by 2015 fewer than 32,000 Appalachian residents are employed as coal miners. President Trump ran on a platform that included promises to revive the moribund industry, but economic experts have said that's virtually impossible.

A sound-rich light feature, "1979 Eclipse Coverage," aired August 21, 2017. Reporter: Brandon Hollingsworth.

Some people are natural introverts. Some are described as loners or homebodies. But for many others in America, particularly senior citizens, solitude is neither welcome nor within their control. This social isolation can degrade quality of life, has apparent connections to depression and addiction, and cane even shorten lifespans.

In this installment of HealthConnections, Dr. Carole Myers and Brandon Hollingsworth discuss social isolation, its causes, and how it can be prevented.

christopher oscar peña

christopher oscar peña's play The Strangers takes a look at America through different lenses. How can friends, neighbors and even family see the same world in very different ways? It's question communities across the country are asking, and it's a key question posed in peña's play. He spoke recently with WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth.

Language Advisory: In this extended version of the interview, Mr. Peña refers to recent political commentary about immigrants "coming from s**thole countries." This phrase has been bleeped.