Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Former FBI Director James Comey's appearance at a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing inspired watch parties in Washington, D.C., and beyond Thursday, as armchair analysis of American politics took to barstools and picnic tables.

The hearing, on Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election and Comey's dealings with President Trump, was projected on walls and shown on TVs in sports bars, as the public looked for new details about a controversy that has dogged the Trump administration.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

Exit polls are projecting a loss of Conservative seats in the U.K. general election, in a blow to Prime Minister Theresa May and her party. Reuters reports that May will win 314 seats, short of the 326 needed for a majority in the 650-seat Parliament, according to exit polls released after voting ended Thursday.

If the projections are correct and the Conservatives lose their majority, May could remain prime minister. But it would require a coalition with other parties.

Pro baseball saw something Tuesday night it hadn't seen since 2012, after the Cincinnati Reds' Scooter Gennett hit four home runs in a nine-inning game. He became the 17th player in MLB history to hit four homers in one game — an outing he called "surreal."

Updated at 12:14 p.m. ET

President Trump says he has chosen Christopher Wray, a former Justice Department official during President George W. Bush's administration, to head the FBI. Wray now works on white collar crime at an international law firm.

The president named his pick via Twitter, writing Wednesday morning, "I will be nominating Christopher A. Wray, a man of impeccable credentials, to be the new Director of the FBI. Details to follow."

Alex Honnold has shocked the sport of climbing by reaching the peak of El Capitan without using ropes, climbing one of the world's largest monoliths in less than four hours with little gear other than a bag of chalk.

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