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Shots - Health News
4:54 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

How Many Die From Medical Mistakes In U.S. Hospitals?

Sometimes the care that's supposed to help winds up hurting instead.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 8:58 am

It seems that every time researchers estimate how often a medical mistake contributes to a hospital patient's death, the numbers come out worse.

In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published the famous "To Err Is Human" report, which dropped a bombshell on the medical community by reporting that up to 98,000 people a year die because of mistakes in hospitals. The number was initially disputed, but is now widely accepted by doctors and hospital officials — and quoted ubiquitously in the media.

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Politics
4:52 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Obama's Latest Challenges Go Beyond The GOP

President Obama gestures as he speaks to workers at the Ford Kansas City Stamping Plant in Liberty, Mo., on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 5:54 pm

President Obama took his fiscal fight with congressional Republicans to America's heartland Friday. Speaking at a Ford assembly plant near Kansas City, Mo., Obama warned that the federal government could turn into a "deadbeat" unless Congress passes a stopgap spending bill and agrees to raise the debt limit within the next few weeks.

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National Security
4:52 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

The Effects Of The Snowden Leaks Aren't What He Intended

Edward Snowden's leaks about the NSA's secret surveillance program have pushed the agency to expedite planned reforms ahead of schedule, according to NSA officials.
Maxim Shemetov Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 5:24 pm

An official assessment of the damage caused by news leaks about government surveillance programs suggests that terrorist groups are changing their communication methods in response to the disclosures, according to officials at the National Security Agency.

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Code Switch
4:52 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

This Tiny Town Is Trying To Stop Neo-Nazis From Taking Over

Craig Cobb's house on Main Street in Leith, N.D., where he spends his days posting online comments advocating for white supremacists to join his settlement. Cobb, a self-described white supremacist, has invited fellow white separatists to help him transform the town into a white enclave.
Kevin Cederstrom AP

A white supremacist has plans to take over a tiny town in North Dakota and turn it into one for whites only. This weekend, members of one of the nation's largest neo-Nazi organizations will descend upon the town in a step toward making that vision a reality — and several residents are trying to stop them.

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World
4:52 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

All Across Brazil, The Art Scene Is Shifting

A couple review the work of Brazilian artist Victor Arruda during ArtRio, the International Art Fair of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sept. 5.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 6:15 pm

Brazil is known for its music and distinctive dances, not necessarily for its paintings or photography. But that is changing. Not only are Brazilian artists now getting big play in major museums around the world, but something new is happening inside Brazil: There's a burgeoning appetite for art.

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Movie Interviews
4:52 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Stuart Blumberg Really Wants To Talk About Sex

Stuart Blumberg has written several films, but Thanks for Sharing is his first directorial effort.
Anne Joyce Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 5:28 pm

When somebody enters a 12-step program to deal with addiction, it's meant to be an all-encompassing, life-changing process — and one we don't always hear about.

But in Stuart Blumberg's romantic comedy Thanks for Sharing, which hits theaters this weekend, the 12-step program is front and center. In this case it's for people struggling day to day with sex addiction, forging bonds with their fellow addicts and sponsors.

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The Two-Way
4:29 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

'On The Media' Presents: A Consumer's Guide To Breaking News

On The Media's breaking news consumer's handbook.
On The Media

When breaking news happens, it's almost always the case that the reporting (and misreporting) of the events shares in the spotlight. (Case in point, Jon Stewart's ruthless take down of CNN's reporting of the Navy Yard mass shooting, this week.)

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The Two-Way
3:47 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Powerful Typhoon Has Hong Kong In Its Sights

In this NASA image released Thursday, Typhoon Usagi is seen nearing Taiwan and the Philippines.
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

Super-typhoon Usagi — the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane with sustained winds of 150 mph — is expected to skirt the Philippines and Taiwan before slamming into the Chinese coast near Hong Kong over the weekend.

The storm is forecast to skirt the coast of Luzon in the northern Philippines on Friday and brush the southern tip of Taiwan on Saturday. Although it is expected to be downgraded in strength by the time it hits Hong Kong on Sunday evening, Typhoon Usagi could still do considerable damage.

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World Cafe
3:18 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Jack Johnson On World Cafe

Jack Johnson.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 11:46 am

Singer-songwriter Jack Johnson recently released his sixth album of breezy, easygoing songs: From Here to Now to You finds him returning to more acoustic arrangements after 2010's To the Sea, which featured more instrumental variations, including electric guitars.

In this World Cafe session, Johnson credits much of his success to his wife, and dedicates a couple of songs to their relationship. The singer also discusses his Hawaiian home and the influence of the indigenous slack-key guitar culture on his style.

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Shots - Health News
2:55 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Study Finds Mixed Results For Back Braces To Treat Scoliosis

Scoliosis didn't keep golfer Stacy Lewis from becoming a top-ranked pro. She spent almost eight years wearing a back brace, yet still had to have surgery.
Jonathan Ferrey Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 3:38 pm

For decades, doctors have been recommending that children with scoliosis wear a back brace so that the sideways curve of the spine doesn't get worse.

But there was scant evidence to prove back braces really help.

And telling a teenage girl she's going to have to wear a brace 18 hours a day for 7 1/2 years, as pro golfer Stacy Lewis did, can be a tough sell for parent and child alike.

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