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Doing More With Less
3:31 am
Wed May 27, 2015

Casa Ruby Is A 'Chosen Family' For Trans People Who Need A Home

Ruby Corado runs Casa Ruby, a drop-in and service center for transgender people in Washington, D.C. Through the center, Corado helps people find housing, medical care and get food. Corado also has 22 beds in transitional housing for transgender adults and youth who would otherwise be homeless.
Lexey Swall GRAIN for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 8:06 pm

Editor's note: This story contains language that some may find offensive.

This story is part of an occasional series about individuals who don't have much money or power but do have a big impact on their communities.

If you're transgender in America, you're far more likely than other people to be unemployed, homeless and poor. And there's a 4 in 10 chance you've tried to kill yourself.

It can be a confusing and lonely life.

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Business
3:30 am
Wed May 27, 2015

In A Digital Chapter, Paper Notebooks Are As Relevant As Ever

Paper can make the abstract tangible in a way that digital devices don't.
Alejandro Escamilla Unsplash

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 3:12 pm

I confess. I'm a notebook nut. I own dozens and dozens of them. Everything from cheap reporter's notebooks to hand-crafted Italian leather beauties.

I wondered: Am I an analog dinosaur, or are there others out there like me?

The first stop in my investigation was, frankly, discouraging.

At first glance, a Starbucks on the campus of George Washington University points to the dinosaur conclusion. So plentiful are the laptops and tablets that they outnumber the double-mocha-half-caf-triple-shot-Frappuccinos.

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The Two-Way
7:44 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Nebraska Governor Vetoes Bill That Repealed Death Penalty

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:00 pm

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts vetoed legislation passed last week that repealed the state's death penalty.

"Please sustain my veto. Please stand with the citizens of Nebraska and law enforcement for public safety," he said, flanked by law enforcement personnel, murder victims' family members and state lawmakers who support capital punishment.

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The Two-Way
7:28 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Heat Wave Claims More Than 750 Lives In India

An Indian farmer sits Tuesday in his dried-up land in Gauribidanur village, in southern India's Karnataka state. More than 750 people have died in a heat wave that has swept across the country.
Jagadeesh NV EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 4:23 pm

More than 750 people are dead in India in a heat wave that has seen temperatures in some parts of the country touching 118 degrees.

Most of the deaths have occurred in southern Andhra Pradesh and Telangana states. The Associated Press reports that more than 550 people have died in Andhra Pradesh since May 13; the number is 215 in Telangana since April 15. Indian news sites say the toll has exceeded 1,000.

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It's All Politics
6:51 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Test Of '1 Person, 1 Vote' Heads To The Supreme Court

Part of Texas' congressional redistricting map from 2003. The lead plaintiffs in Evenwel v. Abbott are residents of a state Senate district in Texas who say their equal rights to representation are diluted because Texas equalized the districts in population terms, and€” not in terms of eligible voters.
Harry Cabluck AP

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 10:11 am

When the Supreme Court returns for its next term in October, among the cases it has agreed to hear is a challenge to a fundamental practice that has governed American elections for generations.

When public-policy makers talk about a state's population, they generally mean the number of human beings living in that state β€” as counted or estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau.

That applies to a host of political actions, including the apportionment of seats in Congress and the Electoral College votes that choose the president.

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The Salt
6:11 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

How Dorothea Lange Taught Us To See Hunger And Humanity

Carrot pullers from Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas and Mexico. "We come from all states and we can't make a dollar in this field noways. [sic] Working from seven in the morning until twelve noon, we earn an average of thirty-five cents." California, February 1937
Dorothea Lange Library of Congress

Documentary photographer Dorothea Lange had a favorite saying: "A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera."

And perhaps no one did more to reveal the human toll of the Great Depression than Lange, who was born on this day in 1895. Her photographs gave us an unflinching β€” but also deeply humanizing β€” look at the struggles of displaced farmers, migrant laborers, sharecroppers and others at the bottom of the American farm economy as it reeled through the 1930s.

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Economy
5:57 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

IRS Reports Theft Of More Than 100,000 Taxpayers' Information

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 6:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Law
5:53 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Before Cleveland, About 30 Police Departments Entered DOJ Agreements

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 6:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
5:53 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

How Worried Should We Be About Lassa Fever?

A single Lassa fever virus particle, stained to show surface spikes β€” they're yellow β€” that help the virus infect its host cells.
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 6:31 pm

An unidentified New Jersey man died after returning home from West Africa, where he had contracted Lassa fever, a virus that has symptoms similar to those of Ebola. Federal health officials are treating the case with caution because the virus, which commonly is spread by rodents, can occasionally spread from person to person.

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NPR Ed
5:53 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Out Of The Classroom And Into The Woods

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 7:23 pm

Kids in the U.S. are spending less time outside. Even in kindergarten, recess is being cut back. But in the small town of Quechee, Vt., a teacher is bucking that trend: One day a week, she takes her students outside β€” for the entire school day.

It's called Forest Monday.

Eliza Minnucci got the idea after watching a documentary about a forest school in Switzerland where kids spend all day, every day, out in the woods.

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