NPR News

Pages

Parallels
2:41 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Best Frenemies: Japan, Korea Mark 50th Anniversary Despite Rivalry

South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se (left) speaks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at their meeting in Tokyo. The two countries are marking the 50th anniversary of establishing relations. While leaders in both countries stressed the importance of the ties, a bitter history continues to strain the relationship.
Issei Kato AP

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 8:59 am

This week, Japan and South Korea are marking the 50th anniversary of an important treaty — the one that normalized diplomatic relations between the two countries. The two nations signed the landmark 1965 treaty after years of war and the Japanese colonization of Korea from 1910 to 1945.

But to celebrate, both countries are having to hide ongoing bitterness.

Read more
It's All Politics
2:01 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Obama Administration To Shift Ransom-For-Hostages Rules

American Journalist James Foley, pictured in 2011. Foley's beheading at the hands of the Islamic State militant group has forced a debate over how the U.S. balances its policy of not paying ransoms.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 5:28 am

This post was updated at 1:25 p.m. ET to include comment from the White House press secretary.

The Obama administration is preparing to announce changes in the way it deals with families whose loved ones have been taken hostage by terrorist groups such as the self-declared Islamic State militant group. Families were invited to a private meeting with administration officials Tuesday in advance of a public announcement at the White House on Wednesday.

Read more
Fine Art
2:00 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Could The Masterpiece Be A Fake? Profit, Revenge And 'The Art Of Forgery'

In 2010 the Detroit Institute of Arts hosted the exhibit "Fakes, Forgeries, and Mysteries" — about how experts figure out whether artworks are authentic. Above, a painting titled A Female Saint (left) that was once attributed to Italian artist Sandro Botticelli is exhibited alongside The Resurrected Christ (right), a Botticelli painting from around 1480.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 2:24 pm

Michelangelo is known for masterpieces like the Sistine Chapel and the statue of David, but most people probably don't know that he actually got his start in forgery. The great artist began his career as a forger of ancient Roman sculptures, art scholar Noah Charney tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

By the time Michelangelo's forgery was revealed, the Renaissance master was famous in his own right. But many other artistic forgers continue to copy the work of past artists in the hopes of passing their creations off as authentic.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Solar-Powered Plane's Japan-Hawaii Flight Is Postponed

Pilot Andre Borschberg of Switzerland sits aboard the Solar Impulse as a ground crew pushes the plane at the airport in Nagoya, Japan, prior to taking off for Hawaii.
Toshifumi Kitamura AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 3:07 pm

The Solar Impulse, an aircraft that generates power solely from the sun's energy, is set to embark on the longest leg of its planned round-the-world journey: a trip of some 115 hours between Nagoya, Japan, and Hawaii. But weather concerns have forced another delay.

The Solar Impulse 2 had initially been slated to take off from Japan around 1:30 p.m. ET.

Read more
Movie Interviews
1:45 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

'Me And Earl' Director Traces Path From Scorsese's Assistant To Sundance

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 5:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Read more
Book Reviews
1:45 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Algerian Writer Kamel Daoud Stands Camus' 'The Stranger' On Its Head

Other Press

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 7:19 pm

Back in college English, I was taught that it was foolish to think that fictional characters have any reality beyond the page. You shouldn't speculate about how many children Lady Macbeth had or what job Holden Caulfield wound up doing as a grown-up.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Senate Votes To Advance The White House Trade Agenda

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 4:58 pm

The Senate voted 60-37 Tuesday to advance President Obama's trade agenda — setting up a big victory for the White House and a painful loss for labor unions.

This latest Senate vote clears away procedural hurdles for legislation granting Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) to Obama. That power allows the president to negotiate trade pacts and then put them on a so-called fast track through Congress. With TPA in place, Congress would take a simple yes-or-no vote on any trade deal, with no room for amendments.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:26 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Actor Dick Van Patten Dies At 86

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 3:06 pm

Actor Dick Van Patten, who played the father on the TV show Eight Is Enough, died Tuesday in Santa Monica, Calif., of complications from diabetes. He was 86.

The news was confirmed in a statement by his publicist, Jeff Ballard.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

NASA Flummoxed By Dwarf Planet's Bright Spots, 'Pyramid-Shaped Peak'

A "cluster of mysterious bright spots" can be seen on the dwarf planet Ceres, NASA says. The image was taken by the Dawn spacecraft, in orbit of Ceres.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

New images of Ceres are the clearest ever taken, but NASA's scientists still haven't figured out the enigmatic dwarf planet. The agency's latest photos of Ceres show multiple bright spots — and a "pyramid-shaped peak towering over a relatively flat landscape."

That's according to an update posted by the space agency, saying that Ceres and its bright spots "continue to mystify."

Read more
The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

Man Who Created The Pink Plastic Lawn Flamingo Dies

The flamingo ornament was one of hundreds of items that Donald Featherstone made for the Union Products plastics company.
Amy Sancetta AP

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 1:15 pm

If you've got a plastic pink flamingo on your lawn, give it a pat on the back. The man who designed the lawn art, Donald Featherstone, has died. He was 79.

His wife, Nancy, tells The Associated Press that Featherstone died Monday and that he had battled Lewy body dementia.

Read more

Pages