NPR News

Pages

NPR Story
5:04 am
Wed May 27, 2015

Sen. Sanders Launches Longshot Presidential Campaign In Vermont

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 7:54 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
5:04 am
Wed May 27, 2015

Are Motorists Paying Attention To The Takata Air Bag Recall?

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 7:54 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
5:04 am
Wed May 27, 2015

How Will The Next President Protect Our Digital Lives?

An engineer from Cisco shows live wireless traffic to a FedEx employee during a recent security conference in San Francisco.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 3:45 pm

As candidates hit the campaign trail, NPR looks at four major issues the next president will face from Day 1 in office.

When President Obama took office back in 2009, "cybersecurity" was not a word that everyday people used. It wasn't debated. Then, mega-breaches against consumers, businesses and the federal government changed that.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:07 am
Wed May 27, 2015

U.S. Indicts 14 In FIFA Corruption Inquiry

The FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland. On Wednesday, Swiss police raided a Zurich hotel to detain top FIFA officials as part of a U.S. investigation into corruption.
Philipp Schmidli Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 3:35 pm

Updated at 2:50 p.m. ET

Arrest and search warrants have been executed against senior FIFA officials and several executives for what the Justice Department says was a corrupt scheme that gleaned "well over $150 million in bribes and kickbacks" over the course of 24 years.

The department announced that it has indicted 14 people from the U.S. and South America β€” including nine senior officials with FIFA, soccer's international governing body. Seven of the FIFA officials were arrested in Switzerland early Wednesday.

Read more
Goats and Soda
3:32 am
Wed May 27, 2015

As Antibiotic Resistance Spreads, WHO Plans Strategy To Fight It

Patients receive treatment at the Chest Disease Hospital in Srinagar, India. The country has one of the highest rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis in the world, in part because antibiotics for the disease are poorly regulated by the government.
Dar Yasin AP

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 3:36 pm

The world is losing some of the most powerful tools in modern medicine. Antibiotics are becoming less and less effective at fighting infections. The problem has gotten so bad that some doctors are starting to ponder a "post-antibiotic world."

Common infections that have been easily treatable for decades could become deadly if the current growth of antimicrobial resistance continues.

Read more
Doing More With Less
3:31 am
Wed May 27, 2015

Casa Ruby Is A 'Chosen Family' For Trans People Who Need A Home

Ruby Corado runs Casa Ruby, a drop-in and service center for transgender people in Washington, D.C. Through the center, Corado helps people find housing, medical care and get food. Corado also has 22 beds in transitional housing for transgender adults and youth who would otherwise be homeless.
Lexey Swall GRAIN for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 10:08 am

Editor's note: This story contains language that some may find offensive.

This story is part of an occasional series about individuals who don't have much money or power but do have a big impact on their communities.

If you're transgender in America, you're far more likely than other people to be unemployed, homeless and poor. And there's a 4 in 10 chance you've tried to kill yourself.

It can be a confusing and lonely life.

Read more
Business
3:30 am
Wed May 27, 2015

In A Digital Chapter, Paper Notebooks Are As Relevant As Ever

Paper can make the abstract tangible in a way that digital devices don't.
Alejandro Escamilla Unsplash

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 3:12 pm

I confess. I'm a notebook nut. I own dozens and dozens of them. Everything from cheap reporter's notebooks to hand-crafted Italian leather beauties.

I wondered: Am I an analog dinosaur, or are there others out there like me?

The first stop in my investigation was, frankly, discouraging.

At first glance, a Starbucks on the campus of George Washington University points to the dinosaur conclusion. So plentiful are the laptops and tablets that they outnumber the double-mocha-half-caf-triple-shot-Frappuccinos.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:44 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Nebraska Governor Vetoes Bill That Repealed Death Penalty

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:00 pm

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts vetoed legislation passed last week that repealed the state's death penalty.

"Please sustain my veto. Please stand with the citizens of Nebraska and law enforcement for public safety," he said, flanked by law enforcement personnel, murder victims' family members and state lawmakers who support capital punishment.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:28 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Heat Wave Claims More Than 750 Lives In India

An Indian farmer sits Tuesday in his dried-up land in Gauribidanur village, in southern India's Karnataka state. More than 750 people have died in a heat wave that has swept across the country.
Jagadeesh NV EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 4:23 pm

More than 750 people are dead in India in a heat wave that has seen temperatures in some parts of the country touching 118 degrees.

Most of the deaths have occurred in southern Andhra Pradesh and Telangana states. The Associated Press reports that more than 550 people have died in Andhra Pradesh since May 13; the number is 215 in Telangana since April 15. Indian news sites say the toll has exceeded 1,000.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:51 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Test Of '1 Person, 1 Vote' Heads To The Supreme Court

Part of Texas' congressional redistricting map from 2003. The lead plaintiffs in Evenwel v. Abbott are residents of a state Senate district in Texas who say their equal rights to representation are diluted because Texas equalized the districts in population terms, and€” not in terms of eligible voters.
Harry Cabluck AP

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 10:11 am

When the Supreme Court returns for its next term in October, among the cases it has agreed to hear is a challenge to a fundamental practice that has governed American elections for generations.

When public-policy makers talk about a state's population, they generally mean the number of human beings living in that state β€” as counted or estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau.

That applies to a host of political actions, including the apportionment of seats in Congress and the Electoral College votes that choose the president.

Read more

Pages