News

UT Returns To Wales

Sep 6, 2016

On Changing Course, Todd Steed interviews Dr. Millie Gimmel about the return of one of the most popular UT Study Abroad programs. 

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

If you’ve used the free, official highway map of Tennessee, you have Bob Boutiette to thank. From his tenth-floor office at the Tennessee Department of Transportation in Nashville, Boutiette helps edit and update the state map issued each year. And it starts with Post-It notes.

“It just so happens that...over on my desk, I have a 2015 state map with sticky notes on it," Boutiette says. "Because that’s the best way to really keep track of [changes and errors].”

The 2016 presidential campaign is breaking all the rules when it comes to how the candidates speak, communicate with the public and get their messages out to voters.   On this episode of Dialogue, WUOT's Matt Shafer Powell welcomes University of Tennessee Political Communication professor Stuart Brotman, a veteran of four presidential administrations.  They look at how this year’s race for the White House compares with past campaigns—and how it will inform future campaigns.

Matt Shafer Powell, WUOT News

Unmanned space probes and rovers are impressive feats of engineering, and they take great photos, but there’s something missing. The last time humans brought back a piece of the place they visited was during the Apollo program, nearly 45 years ago. Now, NASA is ready to embark on a mission that will swoop down close to the surface of an asteroid called Bennu. A long arm of the spacecraft will scoop up soil and rocks, and fly back to Earth.

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On August 29, 2016, our morning news updates left the impression Tennessee State House candidate Rick Staples is resigning from the League of Women Voters of Knox County.  In truth, Staples is resigning from LWV's Board of Directors, but he will remain as a member of the organization.

Staples has resigned his position on the board because the League's by-laws prohibit board members from running for public office.   

Randy Fishman sat down with Jack Neely to discuss Knoxville's rich and sometime secret jazz history.  For more jazz interviews visit: https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/wuot-jazz/id437813416?mt=10

  Photographer and writer Reed Massengill is knee-deep in the research for a new book about film director Clarence Brown. One of Brown’s silent films, Smouldering Fires, will be shown on Saturday, August 20, as part of the East Tennessee History Fair.

Massengill’s path to the pioneering filmmaker’s story began twenty years ago, when he was writing a book about Byron de la Beckwith, the Mississippi man that murdered civil rights leader Medgar Evers.

Lola Alapo from the Office of Communications and Marketing talks about her decision to spend part of the summer teaching in China.  She was part of a group of twenty-eight UT faculty, staff and students. 

  The answer, of course, is no.  He's from Jamaica.  But somehow, we missed that day in Geography class.  As a result, WUOT accidentally reassigned Mr. Bolt to the South African Olympic team during our Monday morning newscasts.  The South African team would love it to be true, but alas, it is not.  

It was an error and we apologize for the confusion. 

  On August 8, 1863, Eliza Johnson, wife of Tennessee's military governor, made an unexpected announcement: The family's slaves were to be freed, in accordance with the Emancipation Proclamation issued earlier that year. The place was Greeneville, and the military governor was Andrew Johnson. Less than two years later, the former slave owner would be the man who would lead the nation through its earliest post-slavery era.

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