Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

Many of us take the internet for granted, and may even think of it as a luxury, something to waste time at work or share cat videos. But for some people, no high-speed internet access could close the door to economic and personal growth, from job applications to online college courses. Today on Dialogue, we explore broadband access in Tennessee and what it means for residents, communities and the state.

UK Department of Transportation

More than fifty years ago, The Jetsons predicted life in the 21st century would be defined by homes in the sky and flying cars. History, of course, took a different path. Today's prognosticators say the highways of the future will be filled with automated, driverless vehicles. Nineteen companies say they're working to get models to the market around 2020.

Clarence Brown Theatre

Of all the themes that haunt Arthur Miller's classic play The Crucible, none seems more powerful or destructive as fear.   Set during the Salem Witch Trials of the 1680's, it is Miller's depiction of primal fear that drives ordinary people to commit heinous acts of treachery, seclusion and murder.  

Todd Steed's interview with musician Robert Glasper conducted backstage at the Jazz Showcase in Chicago.  Glasper talks about his time in Tennessee, the limits of labels, Miles Davis, and his son Riley's masterful recitation on the new recording ArtScience. 

What composers immediately come to mind when thinking of Classical music? For most of us, Mozart and Haydn would probably top the list. This weekend, music of both these composers will be featured on the Knoxville Symphony's Chamber Classics concert.  On the program is Mozart's overture to The Marriage of Figaro, Haydn's Symphony No.104, and Mozart's Piano Concerto No.21, performed by pianist, Kevin Class.

The Oak Ridge Symphony kicks off its 2016-17 season this Saturday evening with a concert that features music celebrating both the history of immigration to the United States, as well as the contributions of post WWII scientists in our very own Oak Ridge, TN.  The theme of the program is "Pride of Place." The works being presented are: "Pi to the Sky: Tribute to Discovery", a world premiere by East TN composer Mark Herrell; Peter Boyer's "Ellis Island: The Dream of America", which sets actual text by Ellis Island immigrants to music; and Felix Mendelssohn's concert overture "Calm Sea and Pr

Mark Davis, Getty Images

The saying goes, the camera doesn't lie. But cameras don't snap images on their own. They're operated by people, and those people bring their own feelings, backgrounds, philosophies and biases to the process of documenting life. The result, says Thomas Allen Harris, tells us about the photographer, the subject and ultimately, the viewer.

"I tell my students, you could show 50 people the same photograph, and they could come up with 50 different interpretations," Harris says.

Knoxville Symphony Orchestra

What does an orchestra sound like? Well, it sounds pretty much like you'd think an orchestra would: Brass, woodwinds, strings and percussion playing classical music. But Aram Demirjian says it should also sound like its hometown.

"The most successful orchestras in the country [are the ones] embracing the character of the cities in which they reside," Demirjian told WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth. "And I hope that's what the Knoxville Symphony will be able to do."

Charlene Hipsher has a unique vantage point from which to witness East Tennessee's addiction crisis.

From her position as Executive Assistant to Roane County Prosecutor Russell Johnson, Hipsher sees a daily flow of opiate addicts surging through the courts.   

  These are people she knows.  From families she knows.  She says it's heartbreaking to see.  

"I'm talking to those parents who are not so different from me," Hipsher says, "and they're burying their kids." 

A few years ago, Jim Stokely was looking through some boxes in the Newport, Tennessee house where he was raised with his brother Dykeman, his father James and his mother, the late author and historian Wilma Dykeman.  In the bottom of a flimsy shirt box, he found a typewritten manuscript, held together by decaying rubber bands.  

He began to read it.  And within seconds, he realized it was the memoir Wilma Dykeman always said she wanted to write.