News

Randy Fishman sat down with Jack Neely to discuss Knoxville's rich and sometime secret jazz history.  For more jazz interviews visit: https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/wuot-jazz/id437813416?mt=10

  Photographer and writer Reed Massengill is knee-deep in the research for a new book about film director Clarence Brown. One of Brown’s silent films, Smouldering Fires, will be shown on Saturday, August 20, as part of the East Tennessee History Fair.

Massengill’s path to the pioneering filmmaker’s story began twenty years ago, when he was writing a book about Byron de la Beckwith, the Mississippi man that murdered civil rights leader Medgar Evers.

Lola Alapo from the Office of Communications and Marketing talks about her decision to spend part of the summer teaching in China.  She was part of a group of twenty-eight UT faculty, staff and students. 

  The answer, of course, is no.  He's from Jamaica.  But somehow, we missed that day in Geography class.  As a result, WUOT accidentally reassigned Mr. Bolt to the South African Olympic team during our Monday morning newscasts.  The South African team would love it to be true, but alas, it is not.  

It was an error and we apologize for the confusion. 

  On August 8, 1863, Eliza Johnson, wife of Tennessee's military governor, made an unexpected announcement: The family's slaves were to be freed, in accordance with the Emancipation Proclamation issued earlier that year. The place was Greeneville, and the military governor was Andrew Johnson. Less than two years later, the former slave owner would be the man who would lead the nation through its earliest post-slavery era.

On Changing Course, Todd Steed talks to recent graduate Pamela Sanchez about the challenges and rewards of navigating a new culture.

Four years ago this summer, Megan Rice, Greg Boertje-Obed and Michael Walli broke into the Y-12 nuclear security facility in Oak Ridge. They were there to protest America's nuclear weapons stockpiles. Their stunt shocked the government and thrilled anti-nuclear activists.

Rice, Walli and Boertje-Obed sit at the center of Washington Post reporter Dan Zak's new book, Almighty, which traces the history of nuclear opposition. Zak spoke with WUOT All Things Considered host Brandon Hollingsworth.

  It’s nearly impossible to discuss the change in downtown Knoxville over the last decade or so without Bill Lyons’ name coming up.  Since leaving a professorship at the University of Tennessee to join City Hall in 2003, the Deputy to the Mayor and Public Policy Officer has become the gear that turns the engine of development in Knoxville’s City Center.  On this episode of Dialogue, Bill Lyons joins host Matt Shafer Powell to talk about how Knoxville's downtown has gone from a lifeless, aging hulk to a vibrant, urban destination.  

Brandon Hollingsworth, WUOT News

  This weekend, Tennessee held its annual sales tax holiday. School-related items, including electronics and clothing, will be free of state sales taxes. Sixteen other states hold similar "tax holidays," on items ranging from hurricane preparedness supplies (Alabama) to firearms (Louisiana). But while the holiday weekends are politically popular, their economic benefits appear to be slim.

  TVA's Norris Dam means different things to different people. Not unlike a puzzle cube, the dam's meaning and legacy change as different sides come into view. The dam was the Tennessee Valley Authority's first major project, launched within months of the agency's creation in 1933.

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