Pam Fessler http://wuot.org en Finding A More Nuanced View Of Poverty's 'Black Hole' http://wuot.org/post/finding-more-nuanced-view-povertys-black-hole Ask Anne Valdez what poverty means for her, and her answer will describe much more than a simple lack of money.<p>"It's like being stuck in a black hole," says Valdez, 47, who is unemployed and trying to raise a teenage son in Coney Island, New York City. Wed, 02 Apr 2014 10:16:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 16716 at http://wuot.org Voting Rights Fight Takes New Direction http://wuot.org/post/voting-rights-fight-takes-new-direction It's that time again, when primary voters start casting their ballots for the midterm elections. As in recent years, voters face new rules and restrictions, including the need in 16 states to show a photo ID.<p>But this year, some voting rights activists say they're seeing a change — <a href="http://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/voter-id.aspx#Details">fewer new restrictions</a> and, in some places, even a hint of bipartisanship.<p>Although that wasn't the case last month in Ohio, when the Legislature voted along party lines to eliminate a week of early voting. Thu, 27 Mar 2014 21:27:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 16479 at http://wuot.org Voting Rights Fight Takes New Direction States' Rebellion Against Food Stamp Cuts Grows http://wuot.org/post/states-rebellion-against-food-stamp-cuts-grows When Congress passed a farm bill earlier this year, it expected to save $8.6 billion over 10 years by tightening what many say is a loophole in the food stamp, or SNAP, program. Thu, 13 Mar 2014 23:03:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 15857 at http://wuot.org States' Rebellion Against Food Stamp Cuts Grows In Crimea, Public Relations Can Be As Dangerous As Politics http://wuot.org/post/crimea-public-relations-can-be-dangerous-politics Transcript <p>MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: <p>From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.<p>ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: <p>And I'm Robert Siegel.<p>Crimea votes this coming Sunday on whether to claim independence from Ukraine. Polls indicate the measure is sure to pass. But pro-Russian politicians are leaving nothing to chance. Mon, 10 Mar 2014 20:02:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 15675 at http://wuot.org Can Exercising Seniors Help Revive A Brooklyn Neighborhood? http://wuot.org/post/can-exercising-seniors-help-revive-brooklyn-neighborhood The Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., is known for many things, among them huge public housing projects, extremely high poverty and crime. Last summer, a one-year-old boy was shot in the head and killed as he sat in a stroller in the neighborhood.<p>But that's one side of life in Brownsville. Sun, 23 Feb 2014 10:21:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 15069 at http://wuot.org Can Exercising Seniors Help Revive A Brooklyn Neighborhood? Election Panel: Long Lines Were Management Problem http://wuot.org/post/election-panel-long-lines-were-management-problem The commission President Obama appointed last year to figure out how to fix long lines at the polls and other election problems has sought to steer clear of the many partisan land mines surrounding how Americans vote.<p>The two co-chairmen of <a href="http://www.supportthevoter.gov/">the panel</a> continued to that navigation Wednesday as they presented their unanimous recommendations to the Senate Rules Committee.<p>When asked by Democrat Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota whether some states were doing things intentionally to disenfranchise voters — like limiting early-voting days — commission co-ch Wed, 12 Feb 2014 22:11:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 14648 at http://wuot.org Election Panel: Long Lines Were Management Problem Shorter Lines? For Elections Commission, It's Common Sense http://wuot.org/post/shorter-lines-elections-commission-its-common-sense Transcript <p>MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: <p>This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.<p>ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: <p>And I'm Robert Siegel. Remember the scenes of those endless voting lines in the 2012 presidential election? Some voters waited for six hours or more to cast their ballots. Well, now a presidential commission has come up with some ways to fix the problem. The panel, appointed by President Obama himself, suggests that more early voting and better voting technology would help. Wed, 22 Jan 2014 22:27:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 13759 at http://wuot.org In Appalachia, Poverty Is In The Eye Of The Beholder http://wuot.org/post/appalachia-poverty-eye-beholder <em>President Lyndon B. Johnson went to eastern Kentucky in 1964 to promote his War on Poverty. But when he did, he opened a wound that remains raw today. People in the region say they're tired of always being depicted as poor, so when NPR's Pam Fessler went to Appalachia to report on how the War on Poverty is going, she was warned that people would be reluctant to talk. Instead, she got an earful. </em><p>Lee Mueller has lived in Martin County, Ky., for much of his life, and he covered President Johnson's visit there as a young reporter. Sat, 18 Jan 2014 15:56:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 13621 at http://wuot.org Coal-Mining Area Grapples With How To Keep 'Bright Young Minds' http://wuot.org/post/coal-mining-area-grapples-how-keep-bright-young-minds <em>Fifty years ago today, President Lyndon Johnson stood before Congress and declared an "unconditional war on poverty in America." His arsenal included new programs: Medicaid, Medicare, Head Start, food stamps, more spending on education and tax cuts to help create jobs.</em><p><em>In the coming year, NPR will explore the impact and extent of poverty in the U.S., and what can be done to reduce it.</em><p>When President Johnson waged war against poverty in 1964, he traveled to Martin County, Ky., an Appalachian coal-mining region with a poverty rate of more than 60 percent, to promote his cam Wed, 08 Jan 2014 22:40:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 13246 at http://wuot.org Coal-Mining Area Grapples With How To Keep 'Bright Young Minds' Kentucky County That Gave War On Poverty A Face Still Struggles http://wuot.org/post/kentucky-county-gave-war-poverty-face-still-struggles <em>Fifty years ago today, President Lyndon Johnson stood before Congress and declared an "unconditional war on poverty in America." His arsenal included new programs: Medicaid, Medicare, Head Start, food stamps, more spending on education, and tax cuts to help create jobs. </em><p><em>At the time, 1 in 5 Americans was poor. Today, things are better, but tens of millions of Americans are still living at or below the poverty level. That raises the question: Did the war on poverty fail? Wed, 08 Jan 2014 08:29:00 +0000 Pam Fessler 13207 at http://wuot.org Kentucky County That Gave War On Poverty A Face Still Struggles